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I’m new to riding and was curious as to what RPMs most are shifting from 1st to 2nd, 2nd to 3rd etc. Seems like I was shifting between 2k and 3k, but after reading a review of the Black Bobber today, the writer was talking about shifting at 5k to really feel the torque pull. That seems very high and wondering if that is bad for this engine.
 

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Hi Steve,

I'm no expert and I'm sure more knowledgeable riders will give better advice.

But after 35 years of riding one just has to feel the right time to shift. This depends on the style of riding and what you want to get out of your bike. As a younger rider I would use the revs a lot more because I was more focused on performance. These days I'm much more laid back and more considerate of of the machine underneath me.

My advice? Get to know your bike and listen to it, she will 'talk' to you, as to if you're over or under revving for changing gear.

Enjoy.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Different for different circumstances. Normal running along when you're not in a rush, I'm sort of with what you already do - although 2k is the minimum revs under power really, but if you are "making progress" in an overtake/dash away from lights etc, then 5k is also good... As Roy says, let the bike tell you...
 

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Another consideration is the degree of incline. When riding uphill I rev the motor higher, 4-5M, on level or downhill road I change sooner 2,5-3M. I also tend to keep the revs up on curvy roads, gives me more control for slowing before entering the curve and better acceleration coming out.
As has been said previously get familiar with the machine and remember that she was made to take the revs. The worst thing you can do is "lug" the engine.:cool:

Chico
 

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Another consideration is the degree of incline. When riding uphill I rev the motor higher, 4-5M, on level or downhill road I change sooner 2,5-3M. I also tend to keep the revs up on curvy roads, gives me more control for slowing before entering the curve and better acceleration coming out.
As has been said previously get familiar with the machine and remember that she was made to take the revs. The worst thing you can do is "lug" the engine.:cool:

Chico
Absolutely! For me the biggest bit about acclimatising to the change to the Speedmaster from the Stelvio was the SM box (same as Bobber) is close ratios and higher geared... So I was finding myself going into corners early on a gear or two too high, and not the right part of the power band to ease the load on the front end (always have positive throttle in a corner to shift the weight off the front wheel)
 

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As highlighted already... I wouldn’t recommended watching the rev counter, especially as a new rider as it’s a sure fire means of getting yourself into trouble. Things pop up quickly, cars pulling out, potholes, bends etc, you need your eyes on the road as much as possible otherwise before too long a problem can and will present itself, if watching you rev’s, you’ll lose precious, potentially life saving moments!

The bike has been designed to be rev’d up to the rpm limit, and there’s a limiter anyway so don’t worry about over revving. If you do find yourself bouncing off of the limiter on a regular basis, you’ve probably bought the wrong bike. Having said that there is so much low down and mid range torque that I don’t find a need to ring the bikes neck. Also as mentioned, don’t labour the engine by changing up too early as this places undue stress on the engine. You want clean excelleration with no shuddering from the engine.

So in short there’s no exact rule on where to shift, it’s based on feel and your ridding style. If I’m cruising, as I most often do, then I suspect I’m changing up around 2500-3000 rpm. In this case I tend to find the correct rpm for any given gear when cruising is just over 2000 rpm. There’s plenty of access to the torque from there. If pressing on a bit I’d guess I change up at 6000-6500 rpm.

Hope that helps.
 

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Hard to disagree with any of this advice. It’s all good. With just a little practice, you’ll hear the right time to shift from the engine sound. Cruising will usually be lower revs because, we’ll, you’re just cruising. But when going uphill, downhill or around wide curves at speed, you’re likely to have the revs up. I think as Chico and Larry said, higher revs on curves gives you a feeling of more control and you want higher revs, positive throttle, coming out of the turn. And you definitely don’t want to lug the engine and have your speed and revs today low for the gear you’ve chosen. If you feel you’re doing that, you should probably be in a lower gear.
 

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I've been riding bikes and driving cars with manual transmissions for 50+ years. I just shift when it sounds right. I haven't blown up anything yet. :|
That's experience for you. Spencer said it in one sentence that took me a paragraph..:grin2:

Well done that man.!

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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As all the rest have said, you will get to know when to shift depending on what style of riding you are doing, thinking about it, i generally shift to 2nd between 30 and 40, 3rd at about 50, by this point i'm either at the front of the traffic light grandprix or i'm being shown the arse end of an R1, either way i'm usually backing off a little at this point. Not sure of the speeds i shift at after that, looking at the speedo then is a sure way to come a cropper, tho a short shift into 4th does tone down the rasping roar out of the exhaust to a less 'LOOK AT MEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!' level.


(And for anyone asking, this is of course on a private test track not the A2/202).
 
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