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I have had my bobber for exactly a year. I have put 5500 miles on it. This passed weekend I took it for a long ride over 400 miles. On the way back home, the rear brakes started to grind/ squeak. When I got home there was absolutely no rear brake pad left and the caliper appears to be seized , and there is significant damage to the rotor.

Will this be covered by warranty ? How much will it cost if not?
 

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Very much doubt that my friend. Though if your caliper is definitely seized, could be a valid claim for a warranty repair but If your pads simply wore down which sounds like the case, then dealer will assess that consequential rotor damage to 'contributory negligence' I'm sure. I might expect odd feedback on brake pedal if piston seized or over-travelled. Check the reservoir level.


Post a pic so we can have a squizzzzz.
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Enquire with the dealer about a repair estimate. Don't ask for a quote! Not too difficult a task, take your time and do the work yourself if you have a suitable stand and the right tools, Haynes Manual has you covered. Rotors are upwards of $100+++ to whatever with ABS ring..... Any luck, no need to disconnect any brake lines or bleed.

Footnote of Irrelevance: I suckered in for an addition insurance premium to cover for another two years over statutory OEM warranty, but after reading the fine print clauses, that was worth jack-sh#t and could've used the impost towards accessorising.
 

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Sounds like you're a rear brake person. Assuming you have a Bobber Black there are two rotors in front and about 85% more braking/stopping power (that also holds true for the front single rotor). The rear brake is useful for modulating speed but lousy for stopping since the weight shift forward under braking reduces that brakes effectiveness (notice the fork dive when you use the rear brake? That is the weight shift). Get your rear brake/rotor fixed and start using the front brake like it was intended, i.e. to stop the bike. My rear brake pads last about 10 years on average, the fronts, not so much, however they do last about 15,000 to 20,000 miles and I'm a lard butt (big load).
 

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Buell 1200 was my everyday commute, on average 1,000 miles per week. Running soft compound front pads by choice would see me replacng them every 8-10 weeks, a 15 minute job.

As for the rear, it was useless. Tried all manner of compunds and ended up using a hard spec pad for the sake of convenience and economy. They'd last around 6 months on average without scoring the rotor.
 

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I replaced my rear pads at 6000 miles. Easy job to 15 minutes. They are wear out items not covered under warranty, the rotors, well they will say you should have seen it was time to change out the pads. Because you did not you are responsible for the rotors being damaged from the wore out pads.
 

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I'm going to get shot on here for this, but I've been following this thread thinking "I don't use the rear brake".

In fact, I've never had to change the rear pads on any bike I've ever owned in the last 30 odd years of riding.

Perhaps it's a sports bike background combined with a completely rubbish "if your not accelerating you are braking" riding style ( :p ), but I slow down using the front brake only (still miss two finger confidence on the Bobber Black - must get the EBC HH pads fitted) and use the rear brake only when slow speed manoeuvring, when stopped at traffic lights or on loose surfaces when I don't want to slide the front.

Apart from that my right toes remain firmly on the (slightly rear set) foot peg.

Prepared to be totally shot down now - Lites blue touch paper, runs away...

To the OP @Pengles though - your description definitely doesn't sound normal to me - I'd get it back to the dealer to be checked.
 

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I ALWAYS do 50/50on brake pressure. I think it's a good habit because in a panic situation, one might just grab a handful of front or stomp on back, and it might not be enough. Brake pads are cheap. Rats are expensive
 

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I'm going to get shot on here for this, but I've been following this thread thinking "I don't use the rear brake".

In fact, I've never had to change the rear pads on any bike I've ever owned in the last 30 odd years of riding.

Perhaps it's a sports bike background combined with a completely rubbish "if your not accelerating you are braking" riding style ( :p ), but I slow down using the front brake only (still miss two finger confidence on the Bobber Black - must get the EBC HH pads fitted) and use the rear brake only when slow speed manoeuvring, when stopped at traffic lights or on loose surfaces when I don't want to slide the front.

Apart from that my right toes remain firmly on the (slightly rear set) foot peg.

Prepared to be totally shot down now - Lites blue touch paper, runs away...

To the OP @Pengles though - your description definitely doesn't sound normal to me - I'd get it back to the dealer to be checked.
Sounds like you have it figured out.
 

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I did 8,000miles before my front pads needed changing (replaced with EBC Sintered HH pads best bang for buck upgrade ever) and at that point I had over 50% left on my rear pads, so I guess I don't use them that much either! Which surprised me because like my Harley before it at speed I almost always back up the front with the rear brake the reason - it helps you stop you faster!

My two cents - On many modern bikes the brakes are now so good apart from low speed manoeuvring were the rear brake helps to steady the bike you never need the rear brake because if the back wheel's not off the ground your not braking hard enough and long gone are the day of fearing a front end lock up as you've now got ABS. But on a long and low cruiser with firm suspension and mediocre brakes, where most of the riders weight is over the back wheel, the weigh distribution is completely different, you don't get the same weight transfer to the front under braking and rear becomes much more important.
 

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I'm going to get shot on here for this, but I've been following this thread thinking "I don't use the rear brake".

In fact, I've never had to change the rear pads on any bike I've ever owned in the last 30 odd years of riding.

Perhaps it's a sports bike background combined with a completely rubbish "if your not accelerating you are braking" riding style ( :p ), but I slow down using the front brake only (still miss two finger confidence on the Bobber Black - must get the EBC HH pads fitted) and use the rear brake only when slow speed manoeuvring, when stopped at traffic lights or on loose surfaces when I don't want to slide the front.

Apart from that my right toes remain firmly on the (slightly rear set) foot peg.

Prepared to be totally shot down now - Lites blue touch paper, runs away...

To the OP @Pengles though - your description definitely doesn't sound normal to me - I'd get it back to the dealer to be checked.
I agree. I came from Motocross to Cruisers and never started using the rear brake except, as you mentioned, slow maneuvers and when sitting still. I have on occasion used it in a turn if I want to stand the bike up quickly but that is only if really needed.
 

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As for the rear, it was useless. Tried all manner of compounds and ended up using a hard spec pad for the sake of convenience and economy. They'd last around 6 months on average without scoring the rotor.
I quantify that statement with regards to rear use by mentioning my commutes were through peak traffic riding, lane splitting and the like.

Otherwise I'm primary a front brake rider and two finger front brake 'stoppies' on Buell's are (were) so much fun.
 

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I'm with those who only use the rear brake for slow speed stability. The only thing I've done to mine is to change the fluid and bleed the brakes really well. That transformed the front brake. It's still pretty wooden but it pulls up fine with just one finger now.

With regard to the OP's question - if the rear caliper was seized so that the rear brake was permanently on wouldn't you have noticed that the bike was difficult to move and there would have been a smell from the brake?
 

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My rear brake pads hit the end of their lifespan at 7000 miles , I often overused them when I first got the bike but started trusting the front brakes with a downshift more often. My rear caliper got scratched a little bit but I didn't have any signs of thin pads beforehand. After I switched them out the rear caliper looked good after mating to the new sintered brake pads over a few hundred miles.
 

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My rear brake pads hit the end of their lifespan at 7000 miles , I often overused them when I first got the bike but started trusting the front brakes with a downshift more often. My rear caliper got scratched a little bit but I didn't have any signs of thin pads beforehand. After I switched them out the rear caliper looked good after mating to the new sintered brake pads over a few hundred miles.
Did you check the reservoir level? Was it about 1/2 in the sightglass? That was your clue.
 

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Got my fluids switched out at the dealer after an accident with a total frame replacement, so no, didn't have any sound or braking problems so must have just hit the rotor before I looked it over after s ride. Got a dual serial number bike now, should make registration after my next move fun.
 
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