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Discussion Starter #1
A local motorcycle dealership (RideNow Powersports in Concord, NC) is no longer selling Triumph. I walked into the store this afternoon to look at accessories and the Triumph section was gone. Triumph picked up all their inventory Friday afternoon. (My regular Triumph dealership is in Charlotte, NC.)

When I visit California I also visit CalMoto in Mountain View. They used to be a Triumph dealership. They aren't anymore.

This is starting to worry me. How many U.S. dealerships is Triumph going to close? :frown2:
 

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The ones that won't comply. Triumph isn't closing them , the dealers are asked to do certain things (Remodels when directed.....that is the expensive one , as well as other things) and if they can't/won't , Triumph gets their stuff. My dealer is strong , and the owners has told me that if they weren't doing so well selling them , they likely wouldn't jump through the hoops. Triumph is strong , they are looking for strong dealers. That being said , I Don't endorse them pulling their product from every dealer that can't/won't meet their Criteria. I feel it should be based on the market. Downtown NYC , all the bells and whistles.....BFE , plan B as far as spending gobs of cash to meet the criteria. My dealer is currently going through the change......new paint , tile floors , etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The ones that won't comply. Triumph isn't closing them , the dealers are asked to do certain things (Remodels when directed.....that is the expensive one , as well as other things) and if they can't/won't , Triumph gets their stuff. My dealer is strong , and the owners has told me that if they weren't doing so well selling them , they likely wouldn't jump through the hoops. Triumph is strong , they are looking for strong dealers. That being said , I Don't endorse them pulling their product from every dealer that can't/won't meet their Criteria. I feel it should be based on the market. Downtown NYC , all the bells and whistles.....BFE , plan B as far as spending gobs of cash to meet the criteria. My dealer is currently going through the change......new paint , tile floors , etc.
I agree.

I have a friend who owns a motorcycle dealership. He carries a number of European brands. He has to jump through all kinds of hoops to keep everyone happy.
 

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Nope. We even have a Harley-Davidson dealer in the area that also carries Triumphs. Weird, if you ask me and I'm surprised HD even allows that (although this dealer has been doing it for a number of years). This dealer and a very good exclusive Triumph dealer aren't all that far apart, which is also surprising but, I guess the sales volume supports it. Not sure it's good for the dealers, though.
 

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My dealer advised me the only time Triumph pulled in his area is when the dealer isn't selling. We had one at a BMW dealer and then it was picked up by Ducati dealer where the sales are much better.
 

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I must say, I'm on Triumph's side here. Most dealers suck. In the WA area, only HD dealers are actually open on a Sunday. Given the effort that goes into designing, building and supporting the bikes, I think Triumph are right to want dealers who are actually invested in the bikes and not just taking orders from people who read the magazines or saw it on YouTube.

Motorcycle dealerships are businesses too, and businesses need to keep investing. Being open at times convenient to the customers would be a big step forward in the Seattle area for sure.
 

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the dealership where i purchased my bobber ended their partnership with triumph just last year. they said it was that triumph wanted more floor-room space for their bikes. the dealership has limited space and they sell other brands too (ducati, aprilia, moto guzzi, mv agusta, and because they don't sell triumphs anymore, theyre now a royal enfield dealer). so it's unfortunate that triumph would pull their bikes becuase they could not meet their criteria.

this i don't understand, as i know the dealership does have a huge warehouse. when i purchased my bobber, it was delivered from the warehouse which was fine by me, as i understand they cannot have every make/model/color option on their showroom floor. just so long as they had a few models available to see, and some test ride bikes, was all i needed to place the order of my color choice and it was delivered to my door the next weekend.
 

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Even in the UK Triumph is hot on customer satisfaction. If you get a survey from them and don't 10 everything, they are on the phone to the dealer and you get a call from them to see how they can put things right, same goes for layouts and even down to breakout seating and refreshments (free of course) to keep the Triumph brand managers happy.

If you don't comply, that's it, bye bye. You can still sell triumph stuff but you don't get the 'Approved' status and access to the parts/bikes approved supply chain and end up buying from another dealer to keep stock.
 

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Even in the UK Triumph is hot on customer satisfaction. If you get a survey from them and don't 10 everything, they are on the phone to the dealer and you get a call from them to see how they can put things right, same goes for layouts and even down to breakout seating and refreshments (free of course) to keep the Triumph brand managers happy.

If you don't comply, that's it, bye bye. You can still sell triumph stuff but you don't get the 'Approved' status and access to the parts/bikes approved supply chain and end up buying from another dealer to keep stock.

Yeah, but when I complained to Triumph about the awkwardness of the side stand with footboards, all they said was effectively... "eff off". Very happy with the dealer, but the attitude from the Customer Services was awful... "physician heal thyself"
 

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This seems to have a long history with Triumph, and I'm still undecided whether I should like that or not.

The previous dealership I was at used to be huge in 1999, when I first test rode a Speed Triple. Lots of demo bikes, lots of showroom, lots of gear. But only about three employees and the boss was a rather blunt (and chaotic) biker, not a business man. When I bought my Speed Triple in 2004, he had moved to a smaller location, only two or three demo bikes that he sold as soon as possible, almost no gear. He then stopped selling bikes, only did service. In the meantime gave up Triumph, moved again, and runs a garage that is only open on weekends.

I bought the Bobber at a different dealership now: rather small, selling Triumph only but repairing all brands. They only have about five bikes in the showroom, but have almost all models as demo bikes. They really aim to provide best service: free coffee/water etc of course. Test rides typically get reserved for one hour, try out multiple bikes -> no problem. Just fill up the tank again.
Have my son ride passenger on the test ride: no problem. During service, pick any of the demo bikes and either go home, or just take it for a ride and have fun. Once again, just fill it up when you return it.
Free Triumph shop shirts when you pick up your bike.

However they also made it clear that when I participate in the survey, I should be honest, but also only give them a lower score if it really was the delaerships fault, not Triumph's fault. For example since I picked up the bike within two days but ordered extras had not yet arrived, they asked me to please not give them a lower score and put a comment, because out of their experience no one reads the comments and they get rated purely on score.
And lower score for them has direct impact in how many demo bikes they get, what conditions they get etc.
There definitely is a lot of pressure on them.

On the other hand I have to say, the service is really, really good and the dealers really "live the brand". Compared to other brand dealerships that have a small choice of year-old apparel only, that don't have any parts on stock and treat you like sh*t - yet are the local authorized dealership - I think I prefer Triumph's thin, but high quality service infrastructure.
The brand positions itself as premium brand and I think it's the right thing to make sure dealerships support this image.

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here's what I don't understand . . . Say Triumph has a dealership that carries several other brands. The dealership isn't selling many Triumphs but they move a few. The dealership services a few Triumphs. The dealership sells some Triumph parts and accessories. But whatever the dealership is doing they aren't doing enough for Triumph so Triumph pulls out. Now Triumph has no dealership in that area. They have on one to service their bikes. They have no one to sell parts and accessories. Triumph has not gained a thing by breaking ties with that dealership.

There was a time when Triumph had six dealerships in North Carolina (Asheville, Charlotte, Concord, Greensboro, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem). They have two dealerships now. Oh well.
 

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People still buy the bikes :)

For me, that concept works. I have a couple of Kawasaki dealers within 50 km, the closest one is not even 20 km away.
Their workshop is huge and their mechanics are friendly, workmanship is OK - the showroom is practically non existent and smells like a mix of workshop and cold cigarette smoke.
It's not a place that would motivate me to buy a Kawasaki.
I once took my Zephyr there to have the valves checked/adjusted since I didn't want to go through the hassles, and even though it was just a distance of 20 km, I had to drop off the bike, my wife had to pick me up by car. Doing the same thing again to pick up the bike a couple of days later, since they were so busy and had asked me to give them a few days so they could get the job done. Still painful.

The Triumph dealership is about 85km away, takes 1:15 hours on country roads. But it's an event going there. As mentioned in other threads, they have all the demo bikes there and when booking a service, I can already reserve one of the demo bikes to either go for an (extended) ride while waiting for the repair, or go back home. I know I'll get free beverages/coffee, can browse through accessories and clothing to kill time.
And I know that I will have a fun time talking to the employees (who all life the brand and biking spirit) and since they are always busy with Triumph fans, I know that I just have to stand there and will meet new people and engage in interesting discussions. It's nothing painful but an experience I'm looking forward to.

Maybe this concept works a bit better in Europe where distances are still less compared to the US. In addition my dealership's location is just perfect - it's in a business park in the outskirts of the historical city of Regensburg. Go downtown and have a coffee (-> cafe racer), easy. Go the other way along the Danube river valley. Take one of the side roads going into the hills and you have serpentines, small historic towns, beautiful landscape. It's easy to waste a few hours and have a good time.

I like the service oriented concept, after all it's a premium brand. Similar thing with my Audi, and why I take it to the authorized dealership even after 12 years, and even though their hourly rates are almost twice as expensive as that of free workshops: if I have a service appointment, they will take me to the office and pick me up in the evening, free shuttle service. If it takes longer than a day, free rental car. For any regular service, they will wash my car and vacuum the interior.
Of course in the end you more than pay for it, but the thing is: it's hassle free, and my life is busy enough. I'm coming from a poor family and was raised to do all the work on my own, never to pay someone else for what you can do yourself. If something is broken, buy the tools and learn how to fix it since it won't cost more than getting the job done.
Truth is that I still do that for anything that is feasible and where I feel like doing it.
At the same time I have learnt to enjoy services and am more than willing to pay for them if the quality and treatment is right, and if it just makes my life easier. That's why I drive a Triumph :grin2:

Tom
 

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Have you been to a Harley dealership lately, or Indian. They are very upscale. You must have x amount of floor space and buy x amount of clothing and x amount of accessories and x amount of parts. When you have an allocation increase you must have x amount of mechanics for your allocation and x amount of service writers per mechanics, also x amount of parts guys per your allocation. Everyone is doing this not just Triumph! >:)


If you don't do this they will find someone who will!
 

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I agree with BobbyP. Given how much investment and sheer hard work goes into the bikes, they want showrooms that reflect the quality of the bikes. Most (not all) dealerships just don't reflect the brand.

And I still want to see dealers open on a Sunday. Saturdays tend to be a bit hectic for me, but Sundays would be perfect for taking a bimble to the dealers, chatting with other Triumph fans, buying the odd t-shirt, and lusting after the new bikes. Harley and Indian riders get this experience, and I suspect a cartel operation in which everyone else closes on Sundays so that there is no choice for customers. Grumble grumble.

- Pasta
 

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From what I have heard Triumph is trying to make a maximum profit with the dealer. So where do they make the best profit? not with the bikes... it's with the accessories, the clothing etc. . Over here in Germany they require the dealer to dedicate a rather big part of the showroom to those products and looking at myself it works. Everytime I am at one of my dealers I buy at least a t-shirt or something like that. Production in Asia is 3 Euros at the most and they sell it at 39 Euros... seems to work in my book
 

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The main money to be made in a motor business is in the workshop... 80% gross profit margin... Accessories etc, max 30%...
 
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Hi Gents,

This has been an interesting thread and I've learned a lot about a topic I have little knowledge on, so my thanks to all who have contributed.

The dealer I purchased mine from was very small and was a dedicated Triumph dealer. I'm getting my first service this week so plan to do a full write up on my experience once this is done.

I do wish they were open on Sundays and provided a place for likeminded Triumph enthusiasts to meet up etc. I was used to this with Harley dealers back in the 80's in the UK and we would go for ride-outs etc. I think it's a great way to promote the brand. I do plan to bring this up with the dealership owner when able.

After paying the deposit for my Bobber I did find myself driving right past the HD dealership, so couldn't help but call in. It was HUGE and I couldn't help wonder if I had made a mistake. However I needn't have worried as the bikes looked a little old-hat to me and I've always been a fan of this brand.

Hopefully in a few days my bike will be back, service done and all outstanding parts fitted. A full review to follow.

Cheers,

Roy
 
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