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Discussion Starter #1
Evening all,

I’ve never done much in the way of touring, on a bike at least, so if possible need to bring myself up to speed by means of picking your brains!

This again relates to my planned North Coast 500 trip and Eitheril kindly provided me with some decent advice, suggesting that I ought to look into a decent Gore-Tex jacket and trousers.

I’ve never owned such a jacket, having always relied on leather jackets for my ridding needs, but I appreciate its wise to enlist the benefits of a, jack of all trades option. No doubt, Scotland is likely to through all of the major food groups at me as far as weather is concerned... so I need something warm when needs be, well ventilated for warmer days and of course waterproof.

I appreciate as with most things, it’ll be a case of it being subjective, but if you could point me in the right direction I’d really appreciate it. Not only am I looking for all of the above attributes... I’d rather buy something that compliments the Bobber, (if that’s possible) and to avoid victim options that are considered to be a bit of a joke. I’m really that clueless on this topic so guidance will I’m sure stop me from making a mistake.

Budget wise... £450 or less. Colour wise, preferably more so on the darker/tactical side.

Thanks in advance chaps and you rare ladies amongst us!
 

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To keep in Bobber style if you are fashion conscious, no textile suit will fit the bill (looks wise).
I have had everything from Rukka to Aerostich and Dainese; they are all amazing, but would look as strange as a one piece racing suit while riding on the Bobber.
Of course these textiles are optimal when it comes to safety and durability (and dealing with all types of weather).

Anyway, Bobber style touring: I would go for some waterproof, high end (and highly protective) jeans like the ROKKERS with some waterproof/warm classic boots, GOLDTOP waterproof gloves or heated FORGE racers if its cold and a Merlin jacket or some other jacket from the Merlin family. They represent amazing value for money and are really comfortable.
I would also recommend some technical, long underwear that are both wind stoppers and easy to clean/dry. They should also be able to deal with wicking away sweat if the temps rise.
Socks are also vitally important as is a good neckwarmer. Personally, I use 5.11 tactical socks and a revít neck warmer/windstopper.
I appreciate that this may go over budget, but budgets are made to be broken and the end result enjoyed.

I also recommend something like THIS when travelling. Always handy to have a small, powerful and portable charger to power your phone/helmet in case of an emergency.

When touring, i always prefer to be too warm rather than too cold and bone dry without rain penetrating my gear.
It is super important to keep your core warm and if the temperature drops alot, i would also look at some kind of windstopper garment under your jacket (i use a Revit). The Bobber offers no wind protection, so i find that my chest, knees and neck can get cold easily.
 

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eisen77, I have ever heard of or seen the Merlin Yoxall jacket before. This is a great styling match and value as it’s waterproof! Trying to find a USA retailer is next! Thanks, Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #5
To keep in Bobber style if you are fashion conscious, no textile suit will fit the bill (looks wise).
I have had everything from Rukka to Aerostich and Dainese; they are all amazing, but would look as strange as a one piece racing suit while riding on the Bobber.
Of course these textiles are optimal when it comes to safety and durability (and dealing with all types of weather).

Anyway, Bobber style touring: I would go for some waterproof, high end (and highly protective) jeans like the ROKKERS with some waterproof/warm classic boots, GOLDTOP waterproof gloves or heated FORGE racers if its cold and a Merlin jacket or some other jacket from the Merlin family. They represent amazing value for money and are really comfortable.
I would also recommend some technical, long underwear that are both wind stoppers and easy to clean/dry. They should also be able to deal with wicking away sweat if the temps rise.
Socks are also vitally important as is a good neckwarmer. Personally, I use 5.11 tactical socks and a revít neck warmer/windstopper.
I appreciate that this may go over budget, but budgets are made to be broken and the end result enjoyed.

I also recommend something like THIS when travelling. Always handy to have a small, powerful and portable charger to power your phone/helmet in case of an emergency.

When touring, i always prefer to be too warm rather than too cold and bone dry without rain penetrating my gear.
It is super important to keep your core warm and if the temperature drops alot, i would also look at some kind of windstopper garment under your jacket (i use a Revit). The Bobber offers no wind protection, so i find that my chest, knees and neck can get cold easily.
Some great info and advice there... thanks brother!
 

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My recommendation is to wear whatever you feel comfortable in, and just buy a one piece rain suit. Oxford, RST, Richa, just a few examples of brands that do waterproof rain suits for under £50.

Honestly, whenever hitting the road for long periods of time, or touring in your case, I tend to carry my one piece in my 5.11 backpack, rolled up into the size of a small tool roll. (Unbranded, got it for £15 from MCN Festival in 2017) If I feel rain is imminent, I pull over and jump straight into it, takes 2 minutes. It's absolutely perfect, as it's a once piece, so no seems, and you can wear your casual/everyday gear underneath. You'll look rather out of place on the Bobber, regardless of what you go for with adventure/touring gear, as practical textile jackets and trousers don't suit the Bobber, but that's just the compromise you make.

Honestly, a few years back I ran with an Alpinestars Drystar jacket and trousers set up, and I could zip them together, but water would still creep in during severe downpours. One piece every day for me, cheap, you get to wear what you love, and it's truly waterproof. Armor will come down to what you're wearing underneath of course, and for thermals, just good old layers are all you need. A solid investment is a pair of winter gloves, chunky, ugly, but warm. Mixture of textile and leather are the best, I have these, and they're spot on for wind chill and water resistance. https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/113953
Any boots that are Goretex lined will keep water out 100%, as long as you have good trousers with a nice seal around the ankle cuff (snap or velcro that you can pull tight). If not, a pair of gaiters won't let you down, Army surplus are dirt cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My recommendation is to wear whatever you feel comfortable in, and just buy a one piece rain suit. Oxford, RST, Richa, just a few examples of brands that do waterproof rain suits for under £50.

Honestly, whenever hitting the road for long periods of time, or touring in your case, I tend to carry my one piece in my 5.11 backpack, rolled up into the size of a small tool roll. (Unbranded, got it for £15 from MCN Festival in 2017) If I feel rain is imminent, I pull over and jump straight into it, takes 2 minutes. It's absolutely perfect, as it's a once piece, so no seems, and you can wear your casual/everyday gear underneath. You'll look rather out of place on the Bobber, regardless of what you go for with adventure/touring gear, as practical textile jackets and trousers don't suit the Bobber, but that's just the compromise you make.

Honestly, a few years back I ran with an Alpinestars Drystar jacket and trousers set up, and I could zip them together, but water would still creep in during severe downpours. One piece every day for me, cheap, you get to wear what you love, and it's truly waterproof. Armor will come down to what you're wearing underneath of course, and for thermals, just good old layers are all you need. A solid investment is a pair of winter gloves, chunky, ugly, but warm. Mixture of textile and leather are the best, I have these, and they're spot on for wind chill and water resistance. https://www.sportsbikeshop.co.uk/motorcycle_parts/content_prod/113953
Any boots that are Goretex lined will keep water out 100%, as long as you have good trousers with a nice seal around the ankle cuff (snap or velcro that you can pull tight). If not, a pair of gaiters won't let you down, Army surplus are dirt cheap.
Thanks for taking the time to post.

I initially considered a simple, cost effective one piece rain suit to slip over the top of what ever I’m wearing, but realised there are inherent short comings. Namely, I’ll be riding with others so can’t expect nor would I want them to stop when I do throw it on... especially when they no doubt will be wearing Gore-Tex everything so have no need to stop.

The other issue... the rain can constantly come and go in that part of the world so slipping a one piece on and off would prove tricky and wear thin quickly.

But you are right... textiles really aren’t going to look cool or well suited to the Bobber. Thus far I’m keen on the Rokker Revolution waterproof jeans suggested by Eisen... although very expensive! Jacket wise I’m undecided as yet so need to keep researching the options.
 

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If you want that 'old school look' why not go with a waxed-jacket? There lots of choice and most now come with built in body armour.

Then it's just a case of sorting out your bottom half. Leathers or waterproof jeans I'm sure would be great for a light shower but for prolonged downpours then either of them combined with a set of over-trousers would do the trick, and over-trousers would have the added advantage of being easily stored when the sun's shining. Although knowing Scotland that's probably an unlikely scenario, I have a mate from Aberdeen who claims he never saw the sun until he was five! :wink2:
 

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I think that Merlin jacket (Eisen’s suggestion) the Rokker jeans (if, in fact, they’re waterproof) or another waxed jean with some overpants (I use Klim) and you’ll be almost good to go. And you’ll look good, too. ?? Waterproof boots, for sure. VERY quick dry base layers, including underwear, will minimize what you have to pack as they’re incredibly thin and lightweight and dry in a few hours after hand washing. Goretex gloves. Some of this can get pricey particularly if you don’t have a lot of this equipment but, if it’s going to be wet, I think having this kind of gear can go a long way to preventing having a memorable trip turn miserable.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Some solid advice.. thanks chaps!

I’m definitely better at copping with being too hot as opposed to cold so like the general direction of the suggestions.

But... just how wet is Scotland in July out of interest?
 

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Some solid advice.. thanks chaps!

I’m definitely better at copping with being too hot as opposed to cold so like the general direction of the suggestions.

But... just how wet is Scotland in July out of interest?
Inverness in May (a few years ago)
Be ready for cold, warm, dry and rain ;-)
What an amazing place, though !







 

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Scotland's weather is a series of microclimates on the west coast due to the hills (Mountains), rain tends to get stopped there so when it does rain, it can really rain, if i remember right it's about 250 days a year on average it precipitates in Scotland, wettest on the west coast, driest on the east coast.

That said, June temps can vary from just into double figures up to maybe low 20's depending on how lucky you are, from year to year it really is pot luck, seen snow on Aonach Mor and Ben Nevis survive into July, or gone in March from one year to the next.

Just pack a wind-stopper base layer and 2 pairs of gloves (winter and summer) and you have all the bases covered. Triumph do a couple of bonded Gore jackets (£ enough to make you weep but Gore usually comes with a 5 to 7 year waterproof guarantee) and a few others do similar if you want a leather look or a cheaper waterproof waxed jacket you can get a J&S one fairly cheap, i use it as a spring autumn backup jacket, not tested in a downpour yet.

Richa do waterproof leather jeans at a fairly decent price, but not bonded so the leather will get heavy in the wet. but the Halvarssons I'm particularly interested in myself, denim base and waterproof liner for a fairly decent price.

May well be doing a run up norf myself this year, my rehab im doing just now seems to be working well on my back, but it wont be a one day, probably a stop around Lancaster as i won't last a 620 mile hit in one day any more (Used to do it in 8 or 9 hours pre-camera)
 

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Bobber Touring? Aerostich

I’m going to be the guy who’s says screw looks. Coming from someone who’s fairly fashion conscious...I ride an RNineT, Triumph Bobber and have had Harley’s, Ducatis, sport bikes and touring bikes.

Forget looks and worrying about how cool you appear. Wear something very protective and comfortable. The last thing you want to do is be uncomfortable, wet, distracted or less protected when riding long days. I’ve seen too many people go down and suffer significant injuries to ride without good gear.

I was one of those who waited years (30 years of riding roughly) before I’d even considered the Aerostich. It can look like a fireman’s outfit or construction worker depending on the color scheme. I bought a used one on eBay for $350 (older roadcrafter). I can honestly say I love it. I’ve got RevIt, BMW and Klim in my gear history. But the one piece Roadcrafter is so easy to put on, so comfortable and so protective it’s become my go to. Its not fashionable (although the black stealth suit isn’t bad), but it’s seriously the best touring suit I’ve ever worn.

Was it made to look cool on a bobber? No! But it will keep you warm, dry and comfortable for hours on end and god forbid, protected if you go down. I’d go find one on eBay that’s within your budget and go for it.

have a great trip!
 
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