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Discussion Starter #1
This is what I have added to my Bobber. The inspiration came from looking at vintage motorcycles in books. I wanted to remain able to shift normaly with my foot and use the clutch lever. A suicide clutch was not a good choice since
i mostly ride the bobber in town. The shift knob is made of brass and ebony. The linkage was made using hydraulic tubing . Please be kind on my english, it not my first language.
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Very nice. It should be an "interesting" experience shifting with your throttle hand.
 

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Cool! Now just move it the other side and add a Quick Shifter to solve the clutch issue! :p

 

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Amotoalain,

Have you considered fabricating an oblong guide out if heavy wire for the shifter rod to ride within? You could mount it under the cylinder head nut and it would ensure that the shifter rod doesn't flop around much and can't inadvertently make contact with the gas tank.

-GPz
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I d
Amotoalain,

Have you considered fabricating an oblong guide out if heavy wire for the shifter rod to ride within? You could mount it under the cylinder head nut and it would ensure that the shifter rod doesn't flop around much and can't inadvertently make contact with the gas tank.

-GPz
I did think about it, the engine is so smooth that it did not create any problem so far.
 

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I have a 1930 Royal Enfield GL30, which I purchased specifically for the experience of hand gear change. I initially found it very tricky to the point where I had slowed down so much there was no longer a need to change up!

What made life a lot easier was to go back to the original set up with a lever throttle. Consequently now I simply reduce the revs slightly before changing gear and then increase revs again with the lever. The revs do not drop off as the lever is held by a friction plate. This works fine with a 3.5 hp slow revving 90 year old bike. I most certainly would not like to try it with a Bobber!

Realistically though having the gear change on the same side as the throttle must make life difficult as you will have to be very quick on the change to avoid loosing revs and momentum. The old friction knob as found on late 50s and early 60s Triumphs might make life a little easier if you could incorporate one into the throttle.

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Discussion Starter #14
I have a 1930 Royal Enfield GL30, which I purchased specifically for the experience of hand gear change. I initially found it very tricky to the point where I had slowed down so much there was no longer a need to change up!

What made life a lot easier was to go back to the original set up with a lever throttle. Consequently now I simply reduce the revs slightly before changing gear and then increase revs again with the lever. The revs do not drop off as the lever is held by a friction plate. This works fine with a 3.5 hp slow revving 90 year old bike. I most certainly would not like to try it with a Bobber!

Realistically though having the gear change on the same side as the throttle must make life difficult as you will have to be very quick on the change to avoid loosing revs and momentum. The old friction knob as found on late 50s and early 60s Triumphs might make life a little easier if you could incorporate one into the throttle.



Your analisys on the revs when shifting is spot on, the engine on the bobber does lose a lot of revs and make it impossible to shift as smootly with the hand. I ride another motorcycle, after a few days riding one or the other i did not think of shifting with the hand. I then started using it only from neutral to first.

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