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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi Folks,

I think we all are aware of how dangerous riding a motorcycle can be and some recent threads have prompted me to start this thread.

I've been riding almost 40 years and in my youth had more than my fair share of spills, multiple car hits, oil, gravel, ice, you name it and I've dropped my bike on it. Lost both of my older brothers and countless friends and have screws/pins in my bones and many scars to go with them. And yet still I ride.

So lifting this thread up a little, I wanted to write and ask member to share their lessons. Let's pass on our knowledge and be proactive in helping each other out, who knows this thread and the lessons we learn may just save a life.

Cheerio and ride safe,

Roy
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Traffic Lights

I will start this off with a recent lessons and modification to my own riding.

I have now seen many drivers run red lights, one could have easily killed me a few weeks back. So even if I have a green light and the right of way, I ALWAYS slow down, look both ways and don't 'assume' everyone has stopped. This may annoy other drivers but I don't mind.

Think about this the next time you go whizzing through a green light and just give a thought to slowing down and keeping your eyes open.

Cheerio & safe riding,

Roy
 

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READ THIS.................

It's cheesy, daft and downright boring to work through but if you have ever tried keeping up with one you will realise, it really works.
 

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READ THIS.................

It's cheesy, daft and downright boring to work through but if you have ever tried keeping up with one you will realise, it really works.
I read this book at the start of each season. I have the earlier version because apparently there is some slightly dodgy info in the later version.
 

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1) Advanced rider training

2) Advanced rider training !!
I’ve done countless courses and each time learned and applied a skill. The hardest part is getting rid of bad habits we don’t even know we have, so it’s vital an expert watches and corrects any serious mistakes.
It sounds silly, but many riders don’t know how to properly modulate their brakes or control object fixation mid corner while evading an obstacle (while braking and leaned over!) - and if you’ve never practiced these kind of maneuvers it won’t be possible to apply any technique in a time of need.

3) Organized Track Days are GREAT for learning in a safe environment or letting off steam if you are an “experienced” rider.
Off-road schools will also teach a lot about grip and stability, plus they are soooo much fun.

4) Read the road, adjust your speed for the conditions and always keep your eyes up and in the distance.
 

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I will start this off with a recent lessons and modification to my own riding.

I have now seen many drivers run red lights, one could have easily killed me a few weeks back. So even if I have a green light and the right of way, I ALWAYS slow down, look both ways and don't 'assume' everyone has stopped. This may annoy other drivers but I don't mind.

Think about this the next time you go whizzing through a green light and just give a thought to slowing down and keeping your eyes open.

Cheerio & safe riding,

Roy
My wife's car was totaled when a pizza delivery boy ran a red light. I was driving.
 

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Don't push it, particularly if you're on a multi-day adventure. I like to stop around mid-late afternoon, well before I'm really tired and in keeping with my desire to avoid dusk or night riding. Take some regular breaks even if only for 10 minutes or so, hydrate and you'll feel new energy. Usually between 60-80 miles and I'll get off and stretch. Better that than to be bothered by some body part annoying you and focusing on that rather than the road. Last week on a ride a was only about 25 miles from the hotel but, there was a rest stop that I just couldn't pass up (or my knees couldn't :). So, I didn't. So what if I got there a little later. Felt all the better for it.
 

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My #1 thought when riding on unfamiliar roads is "Don't out ride your brakes." This means don't go flying around curves or over hills that you can't see around unless you're sure your speed is such that you'll be able to stop the bike in time if there's something blocking the road just beyond your view. This also helps with curves that have a decreasing radius, giving me more time to adjust.
 

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All the Brits here will have heard of the IAM (Institute of Advanced Motorists) and their training is FANTASTIC... I did my training on an old GTR 1000 (Concours), and at one stage early on I went on a group organised ride-out. They use a "marker" system that I won't go into which means that you finish up following the lead rider. On this occasion it was an the Chief Observer of the group, and he was two up with his wife on an ST1100, which just seemed to float round the bends, and I couldn't keep up...

The group phrase was "it's not how fast you ride, it's how you ride fast"... It completely transformed my riding... I've rejoined a local group for a refresher, it now being 12 years since I passed...
 
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