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Discussion Starter #1
I am used to dirt bikes and generally just use what is at the local dbike store. But what chain lube is reputable for a street bike? What are you guys using? Something that sticks well and doesn't spin off still after being wiped...

Seems we have to lube the chain every 200 miles then let it sit for 8 hours.
 

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WURTH lube seems to be an overall great product, just gotta make sure to give the chain a good cleaning too and do so regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not seeing WURTH chain lube on Amazon in the US. Lots of their other products but no chain lube. Unless I missed it, appears it's not offered here. Only way would be to order off eBay and have it shipped from the UK.

There has to be a reputable brand here....thoughts?
 

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Hi guys,

Picking up the old threat on chain oil.

Didn’t any of you consider an electric chain oiler dropping 2-3 drops of oil every x (6) km, giving an extra drop at speed or rain?
I was used to drive a Moto- Guzzi, ofcourse without the chain, so got used to that. When I shifted over to tiger 800 I had a small problem, ... lubing achain, especially when it rains ofcourse is never gonna be my hobby ( ok, call me lazy) so I found a solution doing the job for me: check the internet on McCoi - Kettenoiler. McCoi.de ( no i do not have a financial interest, As far as i know they also have a English version of www, anyway always enough people over here to translate if needed) As you may know I will have my first bobber in about a month but as the oiler system is normally already Kind of a DIY solution, at the bobber it is going to be even worse as I have to hide or disguise parts as much as possible. Therefore I started building already, created the electronic print, selected an option for the tank, have to prepare that (paint black etc) find (black) solution for original green oil lines etc. Pretty good way to prepare on arrival of bike.
 

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I don’t use chain lube on O Ring chains. The lube for the pins is in the chain. Anything you spray on wouldn’t make it past the orings to lube anything of value. In my opinion, any amount of chain lube sufficient to lube the chain to sprocket contact would be a slinging mess on a high speed application like a motorcycle.

I just make sure the chain is clean and I use a light coat of WD40 or similar product to protect the chain from rust and oxidation. They last just as long as everyone making a mess with chain lube. When they wear out, I buy new ones.

Having been involved in off road riding and MX Racing for many years, I have bought a ton of chains and sprockets and used many different chain lubes.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I don’t use chain lube on O Ring chains. The lube for the pins is in the chain. Anything you spray on wouldn’t make it past the orings to lube anything of value. In my opinion, any amount of chain lube sufficient to lube the chain to sprocket contact would be a slinging mess on a high speed application like a motorcycle.

I just make sure the chain is clean and I use a light coat of WD40 or similar product to protect the chain from rust and oxidation. They last just as long as everyone making a mess with chain lube. When they wear out, I buy new ones.

Having been involved in off road riding and MX Racing for many years, I have bought a ton of chains and sprockets and used many different chain lubes.
I am not familiar with types of chains. You are saying the chain on the Bobber doesn't really need a chain lube, just kept clean?

I have been using Dupont with Teflon....
 

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IMHO unless you are religious in using a can of lube then it really does not matter what you stick on it. Had the SV the longest and used to destroy a chain every 5 to 6k till I fitted a scottoiler, then it jumped up to 18k from the chain (oh and sprockets too, never ever just swap the chain out).

So with the bobber i'll give it a squirt if i remember with whatever can of lube i have lying about (I generally don't do wax as i like to see the lube on a chain when I'm done), usually when i get home i just dab it with a finger, if its still sticky then all is good. Cant think of anywhere on the bobber i can fit a scottoiler/lubetube so when the chain dies, just replace.
 

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I am not familiar with types of chains. You are saying the chain on the Bobber doesn't really need a chain lube, just kept clean?

I have been using Dupont with Teflon....
The main difference in chain types are oring and non oring. On motocross race applications we always use non oring chains. They are all metal construction, lighter than oring chains, and have less rolling resistance. That equates to less drag and more power to the ground. The downside.. all metal construction and no inner lube means that the chains wear out faster and stretch more as they wear.

Oring chains have rubber orings between each pin and outer plate with grease inside the chain. Modern high quality oring chains may be called a X ring or Z Ring, but they are still a rubber oring design. The fancy oring designs are meant to prolong life and reduce drag. Oring chains last far longer than all metal chains but have more drag. Most all modern non race off-road bikes and chain drive street bikes will have an oring chain.

On my off-road bike I use a Regina Z Ring chain. It gets a light coat of WD40 or Teflon based spray after washing. It pounds through mud, muck, and sand and then gets washed again. With good quality sprockets, the chains last a long time. In my opinion, there is just no need to excessively lube the chain. It’s not that big of a deal if you do on a dirt bike, but on a nicely maintained street machine, you will make a **** mess.

On our motorcross bikes we lube the chains with Maxima lube heavily after washing. Depending on conditions, we may lube during the day. It’s my opinion though that in the wrong conditions, more chain lube is just like adding cutting oil to your chain and sprockets.

On my bike I have the top of the line Regina Z ring installed. I keep it cleaned and lightly coated just to keep corrosion away. It’s a gold chain, so I want it clean and noticeable, not lathered and caked in chain lube. All that lube sitting on the chain plates and making a mess is not doing any good anyway.
 

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On my bike I have the top of the line Regina Z ring installed. I keep it cleaned and lightly coated just to keep corrosion away. It’s a gold chain, so I want it clean and noticeable, not lathered and caked in chain lube. All that lube sitting on the chain plates and making a mess is not doing any good anyway.
Permit a novice into chains ask - I used to ride Harley thus chains a novel thing - is the Bobber equipped with O or Z ring chains?
In the manual the instruction is clear for a 200miles/300km lubrication prograsm. You believe that is over the top?
 

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Permit a novice into chains ask - I used to ride Harley thus chains a novel thing - is the Bobber equipped with O or Z ring chains?
In the manual the instruction is clear for a 200miles/300km lubrication prograsm. You believe that is over the top?
The Bobber does come from the factory with a high quality sealed chain. You have to understand the recommendations in the manual have to take in account all scenarios. I don’t ride in the rain or ride down dirt roads. Personally, my chain has an easier life with less chance of corrosion than someone who rides in harsher conditions.

So, to answer your question, yes that is over the top for me. I prefer to keep my chain clean and only lightly coated with a rust inhibitor....not caked up with a tacky chain lube. Opinions on the subject will be different, but I stand by my opinion that some folks make a mess of their tire, rims, spokes, and bike with over kill use of chain lube.
 

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IMHO unless you are religious in using a can of lube then it really does not matter what you stick on it. Had the SV the longest and used to destroy a chain every 5 to 6k till I fitted a scottoiler, then it jumped up to 18k from the chain (oh and sprockets too, never ever just swap the chain out).

So with the bobber i'll give it a squirt if i remember with whatever can of lube i have lying about (I generally don't do wax as i like to see the lube on a chain when I'm done), usually when i get home i just dab it with a finger, if its still sticky then all is good. Cant think of anywhere on the bobber i can fit a scottoiler/lubetube so when the chain dies, just replace.
Agreed, a Scottoiler or similar can improve chain life dramatically, but hiding one on a Bobber will be a challenge. I don't buy this "you don't need to lube the chain" nonsense, there is metal to metal contact, irrespective of whether the chain has its own sealed in grease. However its your chain, do what you like with it. I do the same as Ethariel and give it a spray now and then when I get home and it looks dry.
 

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If you're applying lube every 500 miles or so, things like Wurth are good for their non-fling nature. I've not yet filled an oiler to the Bobber, but on my Tiger I have a Tutoro oiler that oils the chain slowly as I ride along. You can put almost any kind of oil in a luber, as it drips on slowly enough to not fling and is continuous so you're not relying on 500-miles-ago lube. Needs to be clean, mind, you can't use old engine oil :)
 

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:surprise:Hey guys! Time to bring light into the darkness once again:

Look at the picture! You will see easily, that the o-ring (or x-ring, or z-ring) only is sealing the factory lubed friction area between pins and bushings of each chain links against the outer plates of the chain. But the friction area between bushings and rollers is not sealed at all! So obviously a o-ring chain must be cleaned and lubed at least frequently with chain spray (its thinner causes the grease to flow into the gaps between rollers and bushings and then dissipates), or (1000 times better!) permanently by means of a chain oiler!

I always carefully lubed the chain on my bikes with expensive chain spray every 1000 km, and always after I got into rain. Anyway I had to adjust chain tension frequently due to the wear of the chain. Cause I soon was tired of all the money, work and mess with the chain sprays, which didn't stop the chain wear anyway, I installed an engine activated chain oiler (Scott Oiler) on my bikes. Since this moment I didn't have to adjust chain tension anymore! So obviously the Scott Oiler did a great job!

Cause I had a Scott Oiler on almost all my bikes, I installed a small version of this ingenious device on the left side of the Bobber behind the flattened frame (in the back of the air box), where it is unvisible!

Conclusion:

I highly recommend the use of a permanent (engine activated) chain oiler! The oil (you can use cheap chain saw oil, if you like) besides is bio-degradable. Once you adjusted the drip rate propperly, the mess on your rim and around the chain drive is not a big thing. If you are lazy (as I am) you will clean the bike frequently with a bike gel cleaner. If you use a brush for the rim additionally, it will stay pretty clean!

Werner Wernersen:grin2:
 

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Conclusion:

I highly recommend the use of a permanent (engine activated) chain oiler! The oil (you can use cheap chain saw oil, if you like) besides is bio-degradable. Once you adjusted the drip rate propperly, the mess on your rim and around the chain drive is not a big thing. If you are lazy (as I am) you will clean the bike frequently with a bike gel cleaner. If you use a brush for the rim additionally, it will stay pretty clean!

Werner Wernersen:grin2:[/QUOTE]

Any chance of a couple of pics of where you hid it please, i'm rather interested, running a scottoiler would be good!


Another great thing about the bobber is it's not a silly 55 profile rear tyre so even if you do get fling, the chances of ever getting the road surface near any creep or fling is probably lower than your chances of hitting 6 numbers on the lotto 3 weeks running.
 
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