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Discussion Starter #1
So I am finally starting my own modifications, after watching everyone else. My goal is to install footboards, heel&toe shifter, dresser bars, all that kind of thing. First job is getting her racked up safely on my ramp.



Rolled her onto ramp, rested her on the sidestand. Put bike jack under the engine, with teenage boy holding bike upright and raised the rear. Put the paddock stand under her to hold, and removed jack. Then added tie downs and front wheel chocks.

My next trick is to take lots of pictures before I start work so I have something to come back to when/if I **** up. So here they are:









 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
The only tools you need are metric sockets and spanners, Allen keys and Torx bits. This one was from Amazon:



The seat is held on by three Torx bolts, and the tank by two metric bolts



I removed the seat, and rethreaded the bolts into it for safekeeping, Makes it much easier when it's due to go back on:



Prop the rear of the tank up with a handy piece of wood:



You can see the black connector for the fuel line. Now removing this is tricky, but not that hard. There's a great thread here: https://www.triumphbobberforum.com/forum/113-triumph-supersport-bobber-general-discussion/7818-question-those-have-removed-tank.html.

You have to pull the connector cover back, press the two side buttons simultaneously, and pull the connector off. The tricky bit is that the pipe the connector is fitted onto is quite long, and you have to pull STRAIGHT up: any sideways force will be resisted and you'll think the connector wont come off. It does require a good push to start, and my top tip is that when you notice that the sliding cover won't slide back into place, you have successfully dislodged the connector and it's ready for the Long Pull. The two white connectors in the background are for the fuel sensor and pump, and these come off easily once you realize that the black connectors are fitted into the white ones.



This shows them disconnected, and also note the painter's tape around the fuel pipe to prevent dust getting in, and to help me find it next time. On the other (left) side of the tank there is a breather pipe that is just push-fit to the tank. I also sealed that with painter's tape to remind me to reattach it when the tank goes back on:

 

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Hi Psychopasta,

Taking photos is a good idea, I think I will remember everything but then when putting stuff back together realize my memory isn't (never was) that good.

Looking forward to haring how you get on with installing the footboards. I recently took mine off and completely stripped them down to get most of the components powder coated black. I was shocked at how many parts there were.

Enjoying the updates, so keep up with the good work.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Psychopasta,

Let me see your footboards when you get done. I need some badly. Arch support isn't what it was when younger. If you've bought the footboards, please cite your source for them.

Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@DevilDog, you need two things for floorboards. The first is a mounting kit, and the one you need depends on your VIN number. The second is the footboard kit itself. The footboard kit is PART NUMBER: A9770117. Best to get your dealer to order the mounting kit, as it is VIN-specific like I said.
 

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Good advice from Psychopasta,

And I can highly recommend the footboard kit, it totally changes up the ride for the better (in my opinion).

My only complaint is that this kit is all chrome and alloy so visually doesn't look good especially on a Bobber Black. As such mine is all striped down and at the powder coaters, hopefully I can update in a couple of weeks.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Clutch and transmission cover

OK, I want to take the engine casings off to get them plated. First drain the oil.

Then, remove the gear lever. This is easy to do. Just remove the two bolts holding the mount assembly off:



and then loosen the bolt that holds the gear lever onto the splined shaft. Notice that Triumph have put marks on both the shaft and the lever so you can align them properly when you put them back on:



and off she comes!



I'm going to pack this whole assembly up, as it won't be going back on. I'm going to replace it with a heel and toe shifter and floorboards.

Now onto the engine cover. I removed the horn (it too will not go back on) to give easier access to the clutch cable adjuster. Loosen the clutch cable adjuster to give as much slack as possible. Then remove the bolt that holds the cable guide onto the engine cover:



and then remove the two bolts that hold the end of the clutch cable onto the clutch cover:



so that you can remove the clutch cable from the actuation lever. Once that's off, just remove the remaining bolts, and use a rubber hammer to break the seal between the casing and the gasket, and off she comes:





I took the gasket off as carefully as I could, but a small part had bonded and did not come off:



I'll need to come back to that. I then put all the bolts back in, and put painter's tape over the dowels so they don't drop out. I also put painter's tape around the washer on the splined gear change:

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Now onto the other side. The faux gearbox is just a cover over the coolant bottle and rear master cylinder. Remove the four bolts and it just drops off:





Then remove the brake pedal, and all the bolts on the alternator cover. This one is quite hard to get off, and doesn't respond to the rubber hammer. You have a few things going against you here:

1. The magnets in the alternator help keep the cover on
2. The wiring loom enters the alternator cover through a thick grommet and plenty of gooey sealant material

Triumph machined two ridges into the left and right hand sides of the cover, and you need to insert a flat screwdriver and carefully twist to separate the cover from the engine. Do it carefully so you don't damage the metal. A bit of gentle side-to-side encouragement and it finally pops off:



Note the three plain Torx screws holding the wiring loom in place, and the three black allen heads that hold the alternator coils onto the cover. Remove the Torx screws first, and note there is a piece of metal sandwiched between the loom itself and the connector:



Last, place the coils back into the alternator body, and put all the screws back in so they don't get lost:



Some tidying up to do, but it's beer o'clock. I still need to remove the gasket and clean up the remains of the sealant material.
 

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I had dummy air filters nickel plated too as back in the day they were chrome.
Am also going to get dummy carb pieces done, I will send them off with my Speed Twin casings.

Doing a good job with this thread, lots of pics & idiot proof narrative, well done.
I am too selfish/lazy to have done this myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thank you, My Master 0:) The work you've done on your bike has been a big influence on what I'm planning with mine.

I have found documenting builds very helpful to me personally, as well as helping others. It makes me think more methodically about each step I'm going through. It's also great when I come to the rebuild, as lots of photos really helps, and writing the narrative reminds me of WHY things are done a certain way, rather than just doing it that way. I also get lots of help as well. I've not needed it yet on this build as I'm just beautifying a brand-new bike and I'm not yet hitting any walls, but whe I was doing my Guzzi engine rebuild the thread I wrote on the Guzzi forum was a great way to get advice on how best to do things, as well as documenting all the stuff I did.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I should say also that I find reassembly much harder than disassembly. I know Haynes takes the 'reassembly is the reverse of disassembly' approach, but I really need more help with reassembly than with disassembly. Putting Humpty-Dumpty back together again is the real skill!
 
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