Triumph Bobber Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is not a Triumph problem. It is a "me" problem. I can't keep my big foot off of the rear brake. :frown2: The bike will seem a bit sluggish and I will look down and see that my foot is resting on the brake. I've been riding for 40+ years and I only have this problem with Triumphs (Bonneville, Scrambler and Bobber). I never rode the brake when I was ridding a BMW or a Ducati. Any tips or suggestions? :|
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,352 Posts
Generally speaking you shouldn’t be riding with the arch of your foot on the peg unless you are intentionally covering the rear brake.
I’m not sure if it’s possible, but can you perhaps lower the rear brake pedal so it’s angled further away from your foot ?
As SXTONY said, the balls of your feet should be on the peg weighing it down, but if your can’t get used to that position then changing the angle of the lever may be your best bet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
You can Swing the lever around I believe which would mean that you could rest your foot on the pedal without braking :D

My 5¢
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
I have US Mens size 16 feet, never had an issue with hitting the brakes accidentally on any bike...

I'm assuming this is a troll thread, but you could just but your heel on the peg and angle your foot slightly to the right, instead of what you're doing which is resting your foot on the brake pedal anyways (which seems silly to do).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I have US Mens size 16 feet, never had an issue with hitting the brakes accidentally on any bike...

I'm assuming this is a troll thread, but you could just but your heel on the peg and angle your foot slightly to the right, instead of what you're doing which is resting your foot on the brake pedal anyways (which seems silly to do).
Nope. Not a troll thread. I own a Bobber and I've been on this forum a long time with over 900 posts.

My problem is that I am used to riding sport bikes (Ducati) or sport/touring bikes (BMW). With those bikes my feet were slightly behind me and therefore my feet pointed downward automatically. I never touched the foot brake. With a cruiser style bike my riding position is more "sit up and beg" and my feet are slightly in front of me and for me that gives me a tendency to put my feet on the brake. (I have owned 20 motorcycles in my lifetime. The Bobber is the first that is anywhere close to a cruiser so my riding style has really changed and I'm not used to it.)

Besides, I'm an old fart (73) and I don't feel as much with my feet as I used to. (Again, I am not trolling.) So my feet can be resting on the brake without me knowing it.

I was just looking for some tips. Sorry I bothered anyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
On the side of the gearshift if you support the front part the foot , tap the support level. It is uncomfortable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Apologies for coming across rude/bothered, I assumed incorrectly.

I'd just try what I said, let your heel/back middle part of your foot rest on the peg, and your toes to the side of the lever. Making the conscious effort to not rest it on the lever.

Or if you don't like that, try putting your foot like you're on a sport bike with rear sets, more of the middle/front middle part of your foot on the peg, and that way is nowhere near the lever and can easily move when you want to hit the rear brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
I simply adjusted the angle of the brake lever downward. Sometimes I put the ball of my foot on the pegs and sometimes my arch. The foot peg location is a bit odd on the Bobber and I like to vary positions when riding. On a side note, I always adjust handlebars, clutch, brake and shift levers for comfort on my bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The brake pedal is on a splined shaft. If I undo the brake pedal and pull it off of the splined shaft - so that I can reposition the brake pedal - is the spring on the shaft going to unwind?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,580 Posts
The brake pedal is on a splined shaft. If I undo the brake pedal and pull it off of the splined shaft - so that I can reposition the brake pedal - is the spring on the shaft going to unwind?
Yes. But it's easy enough to get back on. I've had mine off a few times and it's never really been a problem putting it back.

As has been mentioned, I was wondering if changing up your foot position might be worth considering. Forwards or footboards?

Cheerio,

Roy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
. On a side note, I always adjust handlebars, clutch, brake and shift levers for comfort on my bikes.[/QUOTEyway!
I am absolutely anal about my adjustments but don't remember adjusting the brake lever, maybe it was perfect stock!. Changing to forward controls made the point moot anyway.>:)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Holy crap I just went out to the garage and I'll be darned -- my Bobber actually DOES have a rear brake! Whipping that nonsense into the trash should save what? 8 pounds? Sweeeeeet!

Thanks!
GPz/Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
675 Posts
Nope. Not a troll thread. I own a Bobber and I've been on this forum a long time with over 900 posts.

My problem is that I am used to riding sport bikes (Ducati) or sport/touring bikes (BMW). With those bikes my feet were slightly behind me and therefore my feet pointed downward automatically. I never touched the foot brake. With a cruiser style bike my riding position is more "sit up and beg" and my feet are slightly in front of me and for me that gives me a tendency to put my feet on the brake. (I have owned 20 motorcycles in my lifetime. The Bobber is the first that is anywhere close to a cruiser so my riding style has really changed and I'm not used to it.)

Besides, I'm an old fart (73) and I don't feel as much with my feet as I used to. (Again, I am not trolling.) So my feet can be resting on the brake without me knowing it.

I was just looking for some tips. Sorry I bothered anyone.
...so maybe adjust the position at which the brake bites.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top