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Discussion Starter #1
Hello All,

I'm in my mid-50s and got my first street bike, a 2012 CBR250R, when I was 49. My second bike is a 2015 BMW F800GT. Now I'm thinking about a retro standard. I've always admired the Honda CB1100 and now the Speedmaster has caught my eye. I'm short of inseam so I'm always on the lookout for cool bikes with an accessible seat height.

I like to ride year-round here in Kentucky, USA and go on extended group rides with some of my friends and colleagues who also ride. We've done one big Spring / early Summer trip together every year since I joined them in 2013 and usually we do one shorter ride in the Fall. We've done the southern Appalachians from Virginia to North Carolina and Tennessee all the way down to Northern Georgia. We've ridden to Western New York, ridden Death Valley out of Las Vegas, and ridden to Big Bend National Park out of Austin, Texas.

Hank

P.S. Almost forgot: I work for a German company, so I've also rented bikes there and ridden the Black Forest, Swiss Alps, Austrian Alps, Slovenia, and dipped into northern Croatia.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks and no, I haven't ridden a Speedmaster yet. On the Death Valley ride I rented a 2014 Thunderbird 1600 that I really enjoyed quite a bit, and I've ridden a friend's new Bonneville Street Twin in a parking lot.
 

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For a sensible, practical, everyday bike the F800GT takes some beating. On the Speedmaster you’re going to have less weather protection, less comfort, less range, less ground clearance, less carrying capacity, and less suspension travel. You’re also going to have to put up with chain drive and a bike that needs more than a bucket of water thrown over it every couple of weeks to keep it looking spic ’n’ span.

But if we all used our heads to buy bikes rather than our hearts then we’d all be riding Honda's! If you like the way it looks and it inspires you then go for it, you won’t regret it. :wink2:
 

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Very true. The F800GT is a sensible, practical, everyday bike. I guess that's why I'm ready to move on from it. It's very utilitarian, almost sterile. There's nothing to not like about it, but at the same time it doesn't elicit much emotion. I've never bonded with it like I did with my CBR250R, which is just so darned charismatic and such an overachiever.

The fuel range of the Speedmaster is probably going to keep me away from it. I would not mind stopping every 100-120 miles for fuel but I'd rather that be an option rather than a mandate. It would be tough to live with while touring or on a group ride. I'll have to give it a lot of thought.
 

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I have a Triumph Tiger that fills the Captain Sensible role and a Bobber for sheer fun. If you're only having one bike, the F800 is a great choice. But if you can for for two...
 

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Very true. The F800GT is a sensible, practical, everyday bike. I guess that's why I'm ready to move on from it. It's very utilitarian, almost sterile. There's nothing to not like about it, but at the same time it doesn't elicit much emotion. I've never bonded with it like I did with my CBR250R, which is just so darned charismatic and such an overachiever.

The fuel range of the Speedmaster is probably going to keep me away from it. I would not mind stopping every 100-120 miles for fuel but I'd rather that be an option rather than a mandate. It would be tough to live with while touring or on a group ride. I'll have to give it a lot of thought.
Hey Futterman, somebody has to set the stop for fuel state in a group ride out, my old friends SL1000 used to be that beast, the rest of us on various fuel levels, my Ducati normally only at 1/2 but we all worked around him, you could be that guy. These days we are on about the same fuel stop state.
 

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Very true. The F800GT is a sensible, practical, everyday bike. I guess that's why I'm ready to move on from it. It's very utilitarian, almost sterile. There's nothing to not like about it, but at the same time it doesn't elicit much emotion. I've never bonded with it like I did with my CBR250R, which is just so darned charismatic and such an overachiever.
You have summed up my thoughts on the 800GT, I have one in my garage with only 2000 miles on it, it does everything well, really economical but just does not stir the loins.
My Bobber with T120 tank can be good for 170miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey Futterman, somebody has to set the stop for fuel state in a group ride out, my old friends SL1000 used to be that beast, the rest of us on various fuel levels, my Ducati normally only at 1/2 but we all worked around him, you could be that guy. These days we are on about the same fuel stop state.
That's a fair point. Few would complain about stopping a little more often. In fact the older guys get a little peeved if we ride more than two hours at a stretch.

You have summed up my thoughts on the 800GT, I have one in my garage with only 2000 miles on it, it does everything well, really economical but just does not stir the loins.
My Bobber with T120 tank can be good for 170miles.
Interesting. What's the capacity of the T120 tank?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The F800GT gets lively when you put it into "aggro" mode by wicking the engine up to 7000 rpm in 2nd and run deep into the curves looking for a late apex. Trouble is, it's docile as a kitten below 4000 rpm in everyday riding.

 
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