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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2018 with x pipe, V&H, and stock airbox with modified filters. The V&H map was installed by the dealer. I have always thought my bike has run fine and was a booster gadget skeptic for sure.

This past week I was caught in town traffic where I had a lot of 2nd gear creeping from light to light. I realized how hard the bike was to ride smoothly at this low speed. It was also evident in low speed roundabouts. It took a lot of clutch work to keep the bike from surging and jerking at the low speed steady throttle times. The bike loves to be fed throttle but doesn’t like low speed lugging. After once again being caught in a long line of traffic due to road construction, I decided to try and make this thing better.

I read the reviews of the booster plug and the theory behind it. For the money, I decided it was worth a try and if it didn’t work, I would never tell anyone I bought it. :wink2: It took only a few minutes to install. I didn’t cut and lengthen the sensor cable and I will not do so. The bike seems to be smoother at the lower rpms and sounds better to me on deceleration. I went though the same roundabouts where it jerked and chugged before, and now it was smooth. It does much better at low speed low throttle input.

I don’t feel like this is a performance item and really don’t feel any difference in power although I certainly didn’t lose any. It just seems to run better at low rpm and that’s what I was after.
 

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I never recognized extensive surging, jerking or e popping on my Bobber (late 2017 EU version). Airbox and exhaust are stock, no X-pipe installed. When the dealer did the 1000km service, they updated the mapping and calibrated the throttle bodies. After that, the bike ran even smoother than before!

The bike runs like a charm even on constant speed with lowest revs!

As far as I know, Triumph provides different mappings for the US and Far East versions of the bike and also different for the V&H pipes first of all in order to match the different quality (octane numbers) of the available fuel! Maybe you guys have other mappings than me?

Cause the ECU is adaptive and thereby adjusts the air to fuel ratio according to the measurements of the O2 sensors, I guess the surging, jerking and popping is not assigned to the air to fuel ratio, which you might like to trick with the Booster Plug! My advice: Update the mapping and calibrate the throttle bodies!

Werner Wernersen0:)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My bike does have the mapping for my region, V&H exhaust, and 91 octane. I also had the throttle bodies synced a few weeks ago.

I was skeptic that the booster plug would do anything, but I can certainly say that it makes my bike run better at low speeds such as driveways, traffic, and slow speeds/low revs in town.

By theory, I guess the booster plug is making it a tad richer. Maybe that is just what it needed.
 

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My bike does have the mapping for my region, V&H exhaust, and 91 octane. I also had the throttle bodies synced a few weeks ago.

I was skeptic that the booster plug would do anything, but I can certainly say that it makes my bike run better at low speeds such as driveways, traffic, and slow speeds/low revs in town.

By theory, I guess the booster plug is making it a tad richer. Maybe that is just what it needed.
Surely if it was running richer, more unburnt fuel would result in more pops and bangs on the over run not less as I think has been mentioned?

In any case I think the issues being experienced would be better resolved via some mapping on the dyno. Dumping extra fuel in isn’t a great idea without it being mapped in precisely and can/will cause issues with the plugs and other areas of the engine.

Are the ecu’s fully programmable does anyone know?
 

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Mike, if you read in full my link to the booster plug site including the pdf download of the full report, you would have read the BP cuts out after a short time as rpm is increased and the stock ecu takes over as normal. The fuel enrichment is only at low rpm so should not be a concern. I suspect (with good advice) that the issues here are due to strict emission regs.

To subject a new bike to a dyno is your option as a remapping does not cure most of the low rpm issues.

I have read but have no experience that the ecu's are programmable but not by the end user.
 

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Mike, if you read in full my link to the booster plug site including the pdf download of the full report, you would have read the BP cuts out after a short time as rpm is increased and the stock ecu takes over as normal. The fuel enrichment is only at low rpm so should not be a concern. I suspect (with good advice) that the issues here are due to strict emission regs.

To subject a new bike to a dyno is your option as a remapping does not cure most of the low rpm issues.

I have read but have no experience that the ecu's are programmable but not by the end user.
I’m curious to learn if it’s a case of the dealers are limited to simply reflashing the ecu with a generic map based on specific upgrades or if it’s possible fully control all aspects of mapping. If it is the latter then removing the issues being experienced by some at lower rpm would be very easy to remove via simple air fuel ratio correction.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It would be a foolish business practice to allow dealer techs the ability to custom map A/F ratios giving them the ability to entirely screw everything up while having to stand behind it under warranty.

They cannot custom map your bike.
 

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It would be a foolish business practice to allow dealer techs the ability to custom map A/F ratios giving them the ability to entirely screw everything up while having to stand behind it under warranty.

They cannot custom map your bike.
I don’t doubt for a second that the tech’s at the average Triumph dealership aren’t able/capable of mapping the ecu. I’m pretty confident all they can do is upload a pre set map into the ecu.

But here’s a thought... do you really think Triumph will stand behind the warrenty if they find out someone has installed a booster plug? For that matter I’d question wether they would honour the warrenty in relation to any area of the bike that has failed and happens to half an non Triumph aftermarket part involved somewhere in that area!

Assuming someone had managed to unlock the ecu and tune it independently of Triumph, it would in reality be easy enough to return the ecu back to the factory setting. Like wise it would be easy to retro fit any Triumph part in the event of having return the bike back to Triumph for scrutiny. Short of having cracked the engine open to fit new cams etc! 0:)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What is the point that you are trying to make?

If you want a cheap way to add a little fueling for low rpm, a booster plug seems to be a viable option.

If you want to be able to adjust your A/F ratios and are willing to spend the money and dyno time, get a power commander.
 

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Assuming someone had managed to unlock the ecu and tune it independently of Triumph, it would in reality be easy enough to return the ecu back to the factory setting. Like wise it would be easy to retro fit any Triumph part in the event of having return the bike back to Triumph for scrutiny. Short of having cracked the engine open to fit new cams etc! 0:)
Yes but with the ecu, there is a memory that shows a history of programming so unlike a slip on etc, there is a record.

I think this is being over-thought. Like MX stated, buy it or not, it's your option. Maybe wait till you take delivery and then decide? That's an option. :smile2:
 

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What is the point that you are trying to make?

If you want a cheap way to add a little fueling for low rpm, a booster plug seems to be a viable option.

If you want to be able to adjust your A/F ratios and are willing to spend the money and dyno time, get a power commander.
I’m certainly not trying to get funny about it chaps so please don’t take it that way. I come from a background of motorsport tuning, and although be it in the car world the principles remain the same.

With the booster plug in place some people have reported less pops and bangs on the overrun as a result of the map running richer. But pops and bangs come from unburnt fuel so increasing the mixture would create if anything more pops and bangs?

Again because of the tuning I’ve been involved with other the years, I wouldn’t personally feel comfortable fitting anything that messes with mixtures/ratios without first reviewing the map to see exactly what it’s doing. I’ve just witnessed the consequences first hand of things running to rich and too lean.

It could well be that all of the R&D has been done with the booster plug and such answers are there already. So, “my point” is to simply ask the questions so that I can build my knowledge and understand :wink2:
 

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I’m certainly not trying to get funny about it chaps so please don’t take it that way. I come from a background of motorsport tuning, and although be it in the car world the principles remain the same.

With the booster plug in place some people have reported less pops and bangs on the overrun as a result of the map running richer. But pops and bangs come from unburnt fuel so increasing the mixture would create if anything more pops and bangs?

Again because of the tuning I’ve been involved with other the years, I wouldn’t personally feel comfortable fitting anything that messes with mixtures/ratios without first reviewing the map to see exactly what it’s doing. I’ve just witnessed the consequences first hand of things running to rich and too lean.

It could well be that all of the R&D has been done with the booster plug and such answers are there already. So, “my point” is to simply ask the questions so that I can build my knowledge and understand :wink2:
Something to note here is that it's not assisting in the "overrun" but the deceleration in terms of pops and bangs, which is, from my limited knowledge, caused by a lean fuel mixture.

The point of the booster plug is to richen the fuel in 2 places, low RPM throttle, and on deceleration...
 

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Something to note here is that it's not assisting in the "overrun" but the deceleration in terms of pops and bangs, which is, from my limited knowledge, caused by a lean fuel mixture.

The point of the booster plug is to richen the fuel in 2 places, low RPM throttle, and on deceleration...
Overrun is one in the same as deceleration. ie... in gear underload and off the throttle.

Pops and bangs during deceleration are a typical characteristic of latent unburnt fuel, (over fueling) igniting upon exiting through a hot exhaust pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Mike, you can argue this all you want, but the fact is that decel pop on a 4stroke is almost always caused by a lean condition in the pilot circuit. If it was a carbureted machine, the first step to get rid of it would be to step up (richer) the pilot circuit. Surely you would know this from your tuning experience. Personally, I have seen backfires come and go...and adjusted for them by swapping brass on race bikes as the outside temps changed. (No fuel injection to compensate like on our bikes)

An explanation of the science of what is going on:

1) When the throttle valve is in the idle position, fuel does not flow out of the main system (needle, needle jet, main jet). Fuel is only delivered to the engine by the pilot (idle) system.
2) The combined effect of the closed throttle and elevated engine rpm is to create a fairly strong vacuum in the intake manifold. This vacuum, in turn, causes a high air flow rate through the small gap formed by the throttle valve and carburetor throat.
3) Under these conditions the pilot (idle) system cannot deliver enough fuel to create a normal, combustible air/fuel ratio. The mixture becomes too lean to burn reliably in the combustion chamber. It gets sent into the exhaust system unburned and collects there.
4) When the odd firing of the lean mixture does occur, it is sent, still burning, into the exhaust system where it sometimes ignites the raw mixture that has collected ---- the exhaust then pops or backfires.


It should also be noted that an exhaust leak that is introducing fresh oxygen rich air to the system under vacuum can also have a tendency to produce or increase backfire.
 

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Mike, you can argue this all you want, but the fact is that decel pop on a 4stroke is almost always caused by a lean condition in the pilot circuit. If it was a carbureted machine, the first step to get rid of it would be to step up (richer) the pilot circuit. Surely you would know this from your tuning experience. Personally, I have seen backfires come and go...and adjusted for them by swapping brass on race bikes as the outside temps changed. (No fuel injection to compensate like on our bikes)

An explanation of the science of what is going on:

1) When the throttle valve is in the idle position, fuel does not flow out of the main system (needle, needle jet, main jet). Fuel is only delivered to the engine by the pilot (idle) system.
2) The combined effect of the closed throttle and elevated engine rpm is to create a fairly strong vacuum in the intake manifold. This vacuum, in turn, causes a high air flow rate through the small gap formed by the throttle valve and carburetor throat.
3) Under these conditions the pilot (idle) system cannot deliver enough fuel to create a normal, combustible air/fuel ratio. The mixture becomes too lean to burn reliably in the combustion chamber. It gets sent into the exhaust system unburned and collects there.
4) When the odd firing of the lean mixture does occur, it is sent, still burning, into the exhaust system where it sometimes ignites the raw mixture that has collected ---- the exhaust then pops or backfires.


It should also be noted that an exhaust leak that is introducing fresh oxygen rich air to the system under vacuum can also have a tendency to produce or increase backfire.
You need to relax and realise that I’m not arguing. Like I’ve already stated I’m just simply trying to understand and learn exactly what’s going on.

On that note your post is very informative and certainly helps so thanks for that :wink2:
 

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As a further comment - had booster plug fitted 2 days go - US V&Hs fitted already. Impression - huge improvement in low speed throttle control, particularly noticed with roundabouts - probably a safety enhancement as bike control easier, acceleration probably smoother too. Much less decel popping.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
As a further comment - had booster plug fitted 2 days go - US V&Hs fitted already. Impression - huge improvement in low speed throttle control, particularly noticed with roundabouts - probably a safety enhancement as bike control easier, acceleration probably smoother too. Much less decel popping.
To me, that was the biggest help. Slow speed throttle control. Almost all of the jerkiness was eliminated.
 
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