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Ever just feel like jacking it all in, selling everything and retiring to a low cost area of the world... with some good roads for ride outs of course?!

I’ve hit a wall... I can’t carry on doing what I’m currently doing, (I basically work in property) as it’s driving me crazy and I think lead to ill health.

I’ve been looking for escape options... different career paths but I’m obviously conscious of the fact that I do in reality need to earn decent money.

Anyone here or been here before?!
 

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Yes, currently working offshore in oil and gas and the company I work for are massacring our terms and conditions, not a happy place to be. Currently retraining (off my own back) as a software developer in my time off, hopefully get something at the end of it.
 

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I hear you Mike, all too well,

From my experience the only thing stopping you is fear. Fear of loosing security, fear of the unknown, fear of taking a risk.

My advice would be just get rid of everything not important and take a chance.

Almost fourteen years ago I did just that. I sold my bike, car, gave up my job and with no more than two backpacks and very little cash, I jumped on a plane left the UK to spend the summer with my sister here in the US. I had no idea what I was doing or what the future held.

Long story short; I found the girl of my dreams who shares my values and views. We both work separately for ourselves, don't earn a great deal and don't own much. However we have our freedom, don't answer to a boss, have no debts and the icing on the cake... I bought my Bobber with cash this year.

Friends/family have no idea how we do it, to be honest I don't either but somehow life comes together and we feel like it's 'our' life. Would we want more? Yes of course we would but that's not the point.

Find someone you love, something you love to do or somewhere you love to be, take a jump, just do it and it will likely all work out for the best. Taking that jump and throwing caution to the wind was hands down the scariest but best thing I have ever done.

Good luck my friend, it's Your life, so do what feels right to you.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Ever just feel like jacking it all in, selling everything and retiring to a low cost area of the world... with some good roads for ride outs of course?!

I’ve hit a wall... I can’t carry on doing what I’m currently doing, (I basically work in property) as it’s driving me crazy and I think lead to ill health.

I’ve been looking for escape options... different career paths but I’m obviously conscious of the fact that I do in reality need to earn decent money.

Anyone here or been here before?!
I think the writing is pretty much on the wall when you say that your job is destroying any happiness in your life.
Might be time to pack it in, take 3 steps back and look more clearly at where you want to be.
From what I gather from you on the forum you seem like a very switched on and amicable person, so i imagine you already have a few ideas in your head with regards to if/when/how you can leave your current job.
It’s amazing when things work out like with Roy (I REALLY enjoyed reading your story, Roy) but there should be a “plan B” just in case it doesn’t pan out.

From a personal standpoint, I’ve always gone with my gut. When it was time to make a change, I did and as Roy said - life has a way of working out (albeit with ups and downs along the way !)

I wish you the best and hope you find the path you’re looking for.
 

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Normally, my advice (and I get asked a lot considering I packed it in pretty early), is to go towards something and not run away from anything. I think that applies to jobs, where to live and life in general. However, it does have to be balanced with your mental health and if the current situation is really getting to you, then it could be time. But, I don't think you just want to wake up one morning and say "now what?" Especially if you have financial or other responsibilities.

My wife and I call it reinvention. We've done it four times, now. When we've felt we were "done" with our location, we had already picked out where we wanted to be next, well in advance. We didn't lose friends, just gained a whole lot more and discovered new things, places and people. That said, we did that after leaving our careers at relatively early ages (for us, not for most of you guys who are considerably younger). Although we were pretty financially stable, it worked out even better in the ensuing years. New opportunities presented themselves.

One last point on big life decisions like this. Our thinking about "what's next" always started a couple of years prior so we had a target. If you don't have one, you not only don't know which direction to go but, you may not even be sure when you get there. If you're lucky (or smart) like Roy, not having a plan may work out fine as long as you're outgoing, know how to make connections with people and are generally open to new opportunities when they come across your path. So, think about what you really like to do, what turns you on and what you're really good at that could point you in the right direction.

Good luck with all of this. It's a big step but, could be the first step of the best thing that happens to you.

p.s. based on what I recall about your physical size, I'd discard the idea of being a jockey :)
 

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I feel for you Mike, I retired early last year (I was 62), but was lucky enough to have two final salary pensions that between them pretty much made up for my salary once I had stopped paying for fares and parking (£6000 per annum) and also had paid off the mortgage. I only kept working to ensure I had a big enough pension to maintain a decent standard of living.


In January an ex boss asked if I was interested in contracting, and I started doing that (having had to go through security clearance) in April. The only reason I went back to work was the quite frankly obscene amount of money I was being offered as a day rate. A year of this will make a huge impact on our standard of living going forward and allow a lot of enjoyment of life.


There are two "slap in the face" type lessons I have learnt in life. Firstly, my parents were of a generation that saved and worked (father worked for one company for life) and didn't spend. I got a work award a few years back that paid for a holiday on the Norfolk Broads, and my father had always said he wanted to do that but never did. In the end, it was only £500 and that wouldn't havee had any impact on their situation, it was very sad to think that I was doing what he had always wanted to do. Second, an old friend of ours said to us one night "there are no pockets in a shroud", and she was found dead in her chair at 63 about two months later.


As others have said, grasp the nettle - but not rashly. Do some research, work out your finances (the main reason my pensions pay is that I pay much less tax on them than I did on my earnings) because there's nothing worse than feeling under financial pressure. Life's for living, you work to live, not the other way round. The way employment is going in the UK with erosion of conditions etc, get out while you can.
 

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I jumped ship

I jumped ship Mike

I worked for one of the countries leading universities as course leader. Fantastic uni... unless you worked there.
Backstabbing, lecturers clambering over each other to lick the management's rear end and get a promotion.
Lies, deceit, it was all there. You couldn't trust anyone further than you could throw them.
Why did people stay? Because they didn't believe that that they could get another job 'so good'!
I saw people come in far less qualified and with laughable CVs and get promoted past - me by sleeping in the right bed.
So I walked
I got a job lecturing part-time at a less successful uni and did freelance work.
I did a great job and was given a full-time position.
I was able to offer experiences and knowledge from my old uni and improve my new place.
I still refused to kiss butt and retired once again as course leader on one of the countries best courses.
I even got invited back to the old uni as external moderator and courses verifier when they needed help.
Fascinating to see a lot of the old faces - still there - still waiting, but now clambering to polish my rear.

Just saying it is possible and life isn't a rehearsal, this is your one go in the circle game.
 

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Abso-freaking-lutely.... High cost of living area, been in my industry for 20 years, have to commute in traffic..... Way burnt out.

But, so far down this road and with good pay, hard to turn onto another road without major sacrifices....like NOT buying the Charger SRT I did a week ago...
 

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I had a major job change at 34 . . . and I had to start preparing for it at age 31 by going to Seminary. (I had basically Zero income for three years while I was working on my M Div. My wife taught school and got us through.) When I got my degree I was bound and determined to go into the Army but the Army wasn't sure. Eventually the Army brought me on active duty and I retired at 62. (I'm almost 72 now.) The switch was a big gamble but it payed off. I have a good retirement plan and health insurance that pays for just about everything. The career field that I had been in was textile chemicals. Textile chemicals in North Carolina went away 30 years ago. If I had stayed in textile chemicals I would be high and dry now.

I can't tell another person what to do but I can say that change is possible.

My dad stayed in the same job for his whole life. I basically had two different jobs in my lifetime. My son is in his 40's and he has already been a part of four different companies and has done well in each one. Times change.
 

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What about a becoming train driver Mike. They get 60k plus here in the UK and their own office with only one seat!

I know of a number of guys who quit their 'fantastic' jobs to do it.
 

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What about a becoming train driver Mike. They get 60k plus here in the UK and their own office with only one seat!

I know of a number of guys who quit their 'fantastic' jobs to do it.



Interesting... That's the last job I would do as you get older...



My first "real" job after Graduate training at British Rail was as a Train Crew Manager (450 Drivers - Engineers for the US, and Guards -Conductors). This was in 1978, and the next next youngest person to 23 year old me was 42... Shift patterns for traincrew are really difficult to cope with, because they can be required to log on at any minute in 24 hours, so 0323, 0025, 1143 etc. With the ebb and flow of train timetables, people would be offered Severance if they wanted it over age 55. Anyone who took it lived a long and happy life, but once they got to 60, you could take their leaving age away from 65, and add the difference to 65 to finish up with the age at which they would pass away.



Funerals were so frequent, I had to keep a black tie in my desk drawer, and by the way there is only one ad in hundreds for trainee drivers, they're all looking for ready qualified..



I also noticed with myself that once I got to 60, the commute got harder and harder (back doing it now but only 4 days a week and 1st class).
 

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Ever just feel like jacking it all in, selling everything and retiring to a low cost area of the world... with some good roads for ride outs of course?!

I’ve hit a wall... I can’t carry on doing what I’m currently doing, (I basically work in property) as it’s driving me crazy and I think lead to ill health.

I’ve been looking for escape options... different career paths but I’m obviously conscious of the fact that I do in reality need to earn decent money.

Anyone here or been here before?!
I feel you. I just left a major corporation with good pay and benefits. I was absolutely miserable dealing with the incompetence and inefficiency that comes with a corporation. I, too, thought my health was being affected.

I left it all to join a start up company and it has been the best decision I've made.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi all,

Thanks to all of you for your comments, advice and stories. It’s proven to be good medicine to read and to realise that I’m not the only one and inspiring to read how you’ve taken a chance to better your situations.

I almost feel guilty for feeling the way I do... I know full well many looking in from the outside at my life would consider me to have made it by comparison to themselves and I’m sure would kill to be where I am. Like I said my problem is very much of the, first world variety and compared to what some are going through I don’t deserve to feel as I do. But having said that it’s all relative and I guess as a consequence we owe it to ourselves to ensure we get what we want/need out of our lives.

I took the last couple of days off from work in order to get my head together. I hit the the road on the bike and have covered some ground which has helped clear my head. Plans are already being put in place to turn things around and will hopefully lead to a better work/life balance.

Thanks again folks... I honestly do appreciate you all :wink2:
 

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Since my daughter has graduated college and is off to graduate school... I've been giving more thoughts to moving on.. leaving this line of work..the job isn't REALY that bad, it's the politics that I can deal without.
As much as I would love to "minimize" and downsize... my wife and I have struggled together most of our life..we are starting to enjoy what we have worked for...
I have learned .. the best time to look for a job, is when u have one..
I believe eventually I will have a small business and probubly work just as much. I have heard it from many people .. and curious if it is true...
If you do what you love, you never work a day in your life...
I've seen plenty of people doing what they love... trying to scrape enough money together to keep themselves off the streets..
I think Im gonna keep my options open.. looking can't hurt...if something pops up..
EFF IT!!.. time to move on..
 

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I have said for years.. my job is what I do, it doesnt define who I am... it allows me to do what I enjoy...
" I concider myself (to quote Henry Rollins) the artist type, not so much as a full artist".
I will continue to do what I do..and continue to do what I enjoy....
It's just getting more and more difficult to find that "happy medium"...
 

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I have said for years.. my job is what I do, it doesnt define who I am... it allows me to do what I enjoy...
" I concider myself (to quote Henry Rollins) the artist type, not so much as a full artist".
I will continue to do what I do..and continue to do what I enjoy....
It's just getting more and more difficult to find that "happy medium"...
Agreed. That hard part is the job is takes up more of your life than what you enjoy. After work, most times I have not interest in riding my bike. Tired, long day, still have to eat and do home sh*t....

If you are burnt out at what you spend most your day doing, it grinds on you. At lease it does me, big time.
 

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Mike,

I can very well relate to that and am in a similar situation.

I got an engineering degree and spent about 15 years in the same company now, moving up through positions into a management position with multiple roles. I have built up engineering teams over the years and put RD managers in place, but am still overseeing them (and top mgmt won't let me out of that role), I have a biz dev role, am working with marketing and sales a lot, and get assigned other roles "on the fly".
We had so many mgmt changes, fluctuation and overall org changes that it does not feel like working in the same company for that time.

The job has major ups and major downs. I don't get any real supervision and am rather free in my working times and going to the office or working from home, but at the same time don't get any real direction and cannot have focus because of the multiple roles. There is a permanent challenge on biz result / revenue and return of invest. I work for a major non-European company and there is also different mentality - in general there is no up front investment into anything, there is no real strategy. Everything is possible, but it always feels like moving with the handbrake on. You might get shut down after weeks or months, even years of investment - sometimes for political reasons only.

I make more than decent money for where I live, and it is more than most people I know make - but could be a lot more for that role if I moved to one of the high tech areas.

I learnt one or two important lessons in the last two years: my previous long time boss and mentor who grew me into the position I'm in now got transferred to another division all of a sudden. He was very hard working, was expecting the same from me, and had very clear goals and expectations about how things would have to be. I have to say he was right in 99% of the cases, but being right does not help most of the times.
Already while working with him, I was more respecting other mindset/culture and taking different approaches - my reporting line already changed while he still was there, and I suddenly realized that a lot of the pressure is created by him and my own expectations in myself. My top managers will challenge me no matter how hard I work because it's their job (and they need to watch their back), but in fact I have learnt that I have a lot more freedom than I thought I would have.
I've found some time to think a while ago and realized that my job could be seen a dream job - no supervision, good pay, in the industry I always liked, getting around a lot. If just the politics and day by day anger would be less... but: a few of my coworkers around the globe left the company because of that lately and although they were totally thrilled in the first months, most of them tell me it's worse in the new company. A few of them of course are doing great, but it's not the majority.

And I have learnt: Even you do the right thing, work your ass off, even your direct management backs you up - you can get canned any time just because you create too much overall trouble.

I'm afraid I don't have any good advice - except that I've been as far down the road as you seem to be, only to find out that I have more power to change things than I thought. It's a lot about own expectations, or like someone said: my job is not my life. My job pays the money that allows me to live.

Now, to make things more complex, let me throw in one thing: I still don't think I can keep going on for much longer. Reason is I'm travelling intercontinental about 6 times per year (Asia and North America mainly). Spending a full day in the office, red eye flight at 11 pm, 12-14 hours flight time in economy class (!). I am more than 6 feet, wide shoulders, about 260 pounds. Travelling on weekends to have efficient working weeks and lose less time with the family. Domestic (European) trips in between, sometimes long one day trips - fly out early morning, meetings, fly back in the evening. I started doing this about ten years ago with about 3 intercontinental trips per year - this year I'll end up with at least 7, recently just had one week at home between coming back from two weeks of Asia and going to the US.
And then we have people in Europe discussing about giving up daylight savings time and people stating how it messes up their bio rhythm. LOL. :grin2:

The thing is: I'm in my 40s only but I can really feel that lifestyle taking its toll. I've had sleep issues my whole life so jet lag was not too much of a deal for me. It can mess me up for 2-3 weeks now. Regular work day each day since I figure it will help me get back in sync, but still end up with 2-4 hours of sleep only. For many, many days in a row. Back pain. Shoulder pain. Sometimes just all joints and muscles in pain, and funny enough this only kicks in a few days after such trip, not instantly. Still think I have a dream job and get paid a lot? :wink2:

So, Mike: I don't want to complain here and I don't feel I can give you real good advice for your situation, but I went into some detail to let you understand what other people deal with and that you are not alone. And I don't think I will be able to go on for a long time, but I'm just not there yet.

Maybe I do have some advice: I have learnt and seen that usually people who think about decisions as much as you do, and who analyize their situation as detailed as you do, will not have any issue being successful in a different position or job. I am in charge of a few dozen employees and unfortunately only have a hand full of people who care as much, and that I can really fully trust and count on. Funny enough some people that worked with me for many years told me the same thing: that they don't understand why I'm worried because they know I'd be successful in any other position, and that any employer could be happy to have me. They are probably right and I'm probably just too full of German Angst :)
Might this also be true for you? :wink2::grin2:

TL;DR: Nothing important here, just a long text about "I feel you, brother".

Tom
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Some amazing shares fella’s... and strangely reassuring to learn others are in or have been in the same boat as I now find myself.

I moved reasonably far from where I used to live and took a job with a new company, all be it the same role in effect. I’ve taken some time away from work this week, been heading out on the bike a far bit to help clear my head and to gain some perspective. I have 18 days less holiday per year with the new firm which on reflection is a huge issue for me. Just taking some time this week has helped recharge my batteries and in turn made me realise the importance of stepping away from work.

None the less it is time to move on and with my time this week several options/plans are in front of me. Here’s to happier times Gents!
 
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