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Discussion Starter #1
Okay gents, here it is, finally finished. I think I'll remove the luggage rack unless I need it, otherwise, I'm pretty pleased with how it turned out.

Few notes... it rides amazing. With only 1 finger, I can brake hard enough for the ABS to engage. It's an animal in the braking department. The turn in is better on the new wheel and tire size, and the ride is better. I can't really attribute this to anything in particular because I changed suspension components, wheels, tires, and all kinds of things at the same time.

Oh, one last thing... the tolerances are TIGHT! The front brake calipers have to be removed to take the front wheel off, and the chain only has 1.8mm of gap from the rear tire. The rear tire is also wider than the rear fender. I love a fat *** though!>:)

Enjoy, and let me know if you have any questions!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Some detail pics:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
More:
 

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Last:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks!

One last thing... HUGE shout out to MikeB from this forum. He sold me some extremely difficult to find aluminum parts that he had someone machine in Canada to fit the X-Arc lamps (front and rear) to Motone adaptors that wouldn't usually work.

It's members/contributors like MikeB that add value to forums like this. If you're ever down south, swing by Savannah and your booze and burgers are on me for a night.

Best,
Don
 

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Looks fantastic! Very well done. Those are some spendy wheels you've got there. I'd love to see you do a write-up on them sometime with your thoughts on what difference, if any, they made.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Follow up thoughts:

After getting a little bit of time to ride in semi-moist weather, here are my thoughts so far.

First, list of mods to-date:

Performance Mods:
Motone X-pipe (full bracket kit)
V&H Exhaust

Opinion: Maybe a slight increase in throttle response. Definite improvement in sound and smell. Yes, smell. It smells sooooo good.

Appearance & Comfort Mods:
Corbin Seat
HAPCO luggage rack
X-Arc Duel Rear Brake Lights
X-Arc Amber Front Signal Lights
Motone adaptors for X-Arc (front & Rear)
Triumph swing bag
Kriega 20L waterproof tail bag
Triumph OEM Short rear fender

Opinion: Corbin seat is much more comfortable. Luggage rack with Kriega tail bag is very useful when going for longer rides. The rack is easy to remove when not needed. Definitely enhances the utility of the bobber. The X-Arc lights are extremely bright and low profile and look amazing. Love the amber to red switching on the back when signals are used. Made in USA -- quality and finish are top notch.

Suspension & Handling mods:
Canyon Motorcycle wide rear rim (satin black, bronze spokes, 16"x5.5" rim with 180 rear tire, tubeless)
Canyon Motorcycle wide front rim (satin black, bronze spokes, 16"x3.5" rim with 160 front tire, tubleless)
Free Spirits Brembo big brake kit (front)
Free Spirits Brembo big brake kit (rear)
Matris rear shock

Opinion: Ride is totally different. Can't emphasize enough how different it is. The rear wheel/tire without the tube decreased weight by nearly 60%, front about 45% (e.g. about 18 lbs in the rear, 13 in the front). The offset was due to larger rotors slightly removing unsprung weight savings. Acceleration improved dramatically, and the ride is not more rough... but more raw. The lighter weight Excel rims without the tube make the experience much more "visceral". Rotational vibration caused by the tire and inner tube, especially at low speeds, are completely gone. However, every surface defect in the road is immediately translated into feel through the bars. To compare, the ride quality reminds me more of my Triumph Speed Triple which had forged rims. It rides like a high performance street bike now. The Matris rear shock keeps the new, lighter weight rear wheel firmly planted. The braking power is 200%+ improved. With 1 finger, I can get ABS to engage. With two fingers, the slightest pull is all that is needed. I have stock brake cylinder and stock levers. I might go with shorter levers just because I feel like I can now without being wary of the decreased leverage afforded by the longer OEM levers. The rear brake is insanely powerful. I'll likely NEVER switch off ABS. Appearance wise, the larger rear rim and tire are FAT and look amazing. Even though the tire size on the front is same as OEM, the 1/2" wider rim causes the rear to also be about 0.45" - 0.55" wider than OEM. If you have the funds, I definitely encourage the upgrade. to the wheels, brakes, and a rear spring to keep the lower unsprung weight in check is a must. Canyon motorcycles was a great vendor to work with, I might add. Extremely responsive and easy to work with. If you do this mod, SPEND THE EXTRA $400 FOR TUBELESS! I think the tubeless tires is really what eliminated the resonant vibrations felt at low speed.

Cost:

This is more subjective, which I don't really care too much for subjective posts because they are opinion driven. But, I thought I'd share the damage:

2018 Bobber Matte Black Purchase Price: $13,400.00
Canyon Motorcycle Stage 2 wide wheels: $3,456.00
Free Spirits Front BB Kit: $1,249.00
Free Spirits Rear BB Kit: $690.00
Shipping costs: $300.00
Matris Rear Shock: $695.00
Hepco Bobber Rack: $254.00
Corbin Seat: $418.00 (includes shipping)
X-Arc Dual Turn Signals (Rear): $159.99
X-Arc Amber Signals (front: $109.99
Motone Signal Adaptors $79.98 (includes shipping)
MikeB Payment for parts for adaptors $60.00 (includes shipping)
V&H Silencers $875.00 (includes shipping)
X-pipe $176.39 (includes shipping)
Triumph Swing Bag $300.00 (includes shipping)
Misc parts & installation of some parts: $1,832.62 (mainly the wheels, brakes, indicators, fluids, etc. I did the exhaust, seat, and rack myself)

Grand Total: $24,055.97

Opinion: Was spending all this money on a hobby Bobber that I'll barely ride which only has 289 miles on the clock thus far rationale? No. Would I do it again? I don't know. Do I have any regrets? No, that would be a waste of time. Do I love my Bobber? Yes. Is there anyway that I'll ever recover any of these expenses if I decide to sell it? No, if I'm lucky I'd be able to sell it for $13,000-$14,000 as it is right now without further milage or depreciation.

Overall: It's a philosophical debate. You have one life on this earth. Risk, reward, failure, and success are all things to be cherished, learned, and looked back on later in life with stoic pleasure from the sense that yes, "I did that". When the bike is in my garage and I'm at the office, I spend a few moments wondering if it was all worth it. While I'm on the bike, riding it, there is no doubt. It's mine, I own it, I turned it into what it is today. I'm blessed to have had the opportunity to create such a beautiful, irrational, unpractical, expensive, and yet oddly fulfilling machine. I'll keep this one for the rest of my life, unlike my other bikes. I spent just as much on my 1299 Ducati Panigale S, but unlike that bike with all its technical superiority, pedigree, and prestige, I like my Bobber more. Everything I've done, working on the bike myself, seeing it in the shop while techs installed things beyond my skill level, and allocating financial resources to the bike only served to strengthen the emotional connection I have with it. It's tough to put a price tag on that or to justify or refute the expense.

Key Vendors:
Canyon Motorcycles (Adrian is a great guy. He's best friends with the folks over at A&J cycles).
A&J Cycles (the run a tight ship... place an order, get a confirmation, order arrives timely).
E-Bay (because some deals just can't be beat).
Amazon (for random things not even installed yet, like my new Kuryakyn plate mount that isn't even here yet).
Savannah Yamaha Triumph (good dealership).

Ride free.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #13
P.S. add in the cost of NTN wheel bearings, the Triumph Short rear vendor, and currently installed vertical license plate mount and I'm probably at closer to $25,000 on this bike. Forgot about those things, and there are probably a few others. :)
 

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All I can say is, other than the luggage rack, PERFECT!
 

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Yes, I agree with Jerrman,

Very well done on a really great build.

Although there has always been a practical side to riding bikes for me, as I like to 'live on them' as much as I can. The reality is it IS and has always been an emotional journey. I always buy/ride a bike a LOVE with little consideration to comfort, practicality and where possible cost.

I think I'm also well over 20 grand into mine and I've just got started.:surprise: I'm not a rich man at all but astride my Charlotte going down the road I feel like the wealthiest man alive and you can't put a price on that.

Life is to love, live and ride...:grin2:

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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I am most impressed with the wheel upgrade, not only does it look fantastic, the lighter weight is a real bonus...losing unsprung weight is a very real performance gain..

As someone that’s shaved a massive amount of unsprung weight from the front end of my car, I couldn’t believe the difference in ride comfort and handling.:nerd:

On a bike that must be multiplied 10 fold...

Better start saving....:crying::frown2:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I am most impressed with the wheel upgrade, not only does it look fantastic, the lighter weight is a real bonus...losing unsprung weight is a very real performance gain..

As someone that’s shaved a massive amount of unsprung weight from the front end of my car, I couldn’t believe the difference in ride comfort and handling.:nerd:

On a bike that must be multiplied 10 fold...

Better start saving....:crying::frown2:
You hit the nail on the head, and you're right, you have to ride it to believe the difference. I've decreased unsprung weight on cars as well, and I'm scratching my head on why I didn't realize that the same effect would be doubly felt on a motorcycle. It's night and day difference. At ~50% less weight spinning at both ends, it's an entirely different bike; acceleration as I mentioned, turn-in, braking... all vastly improved. I should have foreseen this from my past experience with cars... yet I still find myself kind of in shock when I ride the Bobber now.

I'd be willing to bet big money that if one took two OEM Bobber's, Bobber A and Bobber B, and spent $4000 in engine/exhaust performance mods on Bobber A, while spending $4000 on lowering unsprung weight as much as possible on Bobber B, that Bobber B would out perform A in both acceleration and most definitely handling and braking.

I've promised myself to never again be lured into the hype/marketing of performance over the principals of physics. Buy a vehicle, spend your money eliminating unsprung weight first, then any additional weight next, and you'll never go wrong.

Oh, and to everyone in this thread.... sorry about the wayward grammar and incoherent points made in my review. I was having a scotch afternoon and feeling rather introspective. :laugh: If my review left anyone confused about anything let me know what part and I'll clear it up while sober and business-like.
 

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What did you use for cleaning up the tail light mount? Did you make that or can you purchase it?
 
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