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Hi Guys,
I have a 2017 Frozen Silver Bobber.
I used to shift the gears at 2000 RPM for the first year. After first service, service guy mentioned the speeds i have writeen below.

What are the correct gear shifting speed:
Let me know if this is correct-
1st to 2nd : at 40 Kmph (~3500 RPM)
2nd to 3rd : 80 Kmph (~3500 - 4000 RPM)
3rd to 4th: 120 Kmph

Let me know what speeds/RPMs you shift gears at, so that i can maintain engine health with correct gear shifting.
 

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That's far too prescriptive... I change up to 2nd at 20 mph (32kph), 3rd @30 (50kph) 4th at 40 (64kph)... The Bobber and Speedmaster are both "long legged" or high geared, and you shouldn't lug, but changing to 3rd @ 80kph is way too high for me. After all this is a "high torque" engine according to Triumph!
 
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I prefer to let the engine rev into the 3000+ range where it seems to be happier. So I usually keep it in 2nd until 35mph, 3rd to 45mph, 4th to 55mph and only think about 5th when I can maintain 60mph for a stretch. On most rural A roads that means I rarely get above 4th. I've occasionally used 6th on motorways but frankly it's not the kind of riding I want to be doing on a Bobber.
 
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Hello Avijit

Do the revs you are using give you enough acceleration? If so, change up

If not, continue reving until they do, then change up.

There are no set revs; when you shift will depend on the above.

On the Bobber, however, aim to shift between 2000 and 3
 

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3000 in town, and 3000 to 3500 on the highway

This will allow you to ascertain how such revs correspond to acceleration, which, in turn, will allow you to choose the revs (and shift point) for the acceleration you require. There is no ‘set point’ you will learn when to shift when you understand the above.

Don’t change at set revs, though, revs the engine freely through the gears.

Next time you ride in town, practice changing up between 2000 and 3000 rpm; and on the highway between 3000 and 3500 and it will all become clear.

Ride Safe

TMCB
 

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I never really payed attention to the rpms with every shift, so on today’s ride out on some country roads with speed limits 35-55mph, I found it seems VERY abnormal to be shifting anywhere close to 2000rpm! I found that it felt normal to be shifting at about 3500rpm....and believe me, I’m no speed demon. Obviously, like others have said, if you going at it for heavy accel, your going to find shift points much higher.
 

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That's far too prescriptive... I change up to 2nd at 20 mph (32kph), 3rd @30 (50kph) 4th at 40 (64kph)... The Bobber and Speedmaster are both "long legged" or high geared, and you shouldn't lug, but changing to 3rd @ 80kph is way too high for me. After all this is a "high torque" engine according to Triumph!
This is exactly how I ride the vast majority of the time too, unless I'm in a hurry. The variety of shift points in this thread is probably indicative of the variety of mileage experienced by riders on this forum as well. Those of us that shift between 2000-3000rpm are probably averaging 50-55mpg while those shifting between 3000-4000 are getting closer to 40-45mpg.
 

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I'm averaging 70 per proper gallon - 56 per US
 

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Hi Guys,
I have a 2017 Frozen Silver Bobber.
I used to shift the gears at 2000 RPM for the first year. After first service, service guy mentioned the speeds i have writeen below.

What are the correct gear shifting speed:
Let me know if this is correct-
1st to 2nd : at 40 Kmph (~3500 RPM)
2nd to 3rd : 80 Kmph (~3500 - 4000 RPM)
3rd to 4th: 120 Kmph

Let me know what speeds/RPMs you shift gears at, so that i can maintain engine health with correct gear shifting.
Keep it simple... Listen and feel the engine.
Change gears so that you don't drop below 1800-2000 rpm when you select the higher gear. Lugging an engine is as bad as over revving it.
 

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There is no arbitrary shift mark. It depends entirely on engine load. Hill or more acceleration? I'll probably shift at a higher rev range like 4-K ish. Gently cruising? maybe not even 2K.
 

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I come more from racing, so my shifts are usually by feel, but yesterday on a long ride, I took note of my shifts because of this thread.

The only reason that I would ever shift before 3k is when leaving my house early in the morning, or passing a cop since my exhaust is very loud.

The most useful power of the bikes comes between 3k and 5k, so if I’m cruising around, maybe closer to 4k. If I am out having a good time (yesterday was rt33 north of Ojai) then it’s usually upper 4k range and downshifting with a blip when I’m anywhere below 3k.
 

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I come more from racing, so my shifts are usually by feel, but yesterday on a long ride, I took note of my shifts because of this thread.

The only reason that I would ever shift before 3k is when leaving my house early in the morning, or passing a cop since my exhaust is very loud.

The most useful power of the bikes comes between 3k and 5k, so if I’m cruising around, maybe closer to 4k. If I am out having a good time (yesterday was rt33 north of Ojai) then it’s usually upper 4k range and downshifting with a blip when I’m anywhere below 3k.
This^^^ is the answer, guys. No matter the bike, from Grom to Harley-'Glide to R1 to Goldwing, it will tell you when to shift it for the way YOU need to ride at that moment. Further, while there are two pretty much objective limits, lugging the engine on one end, and bouncing off the limiter on the other, you might prefer to shift at a different point than me for given conditions, which is perfectly fine. The other guy's shift points may not be your shift points. Certainly, you may like to get a "rough idea," which the earlier posts have done, of folks' thoughts, so you can try out what others do, especially if you're not extremely experienced with motorcycles.

A tach is a wonderfully useful instrument, when you're learning your bike, and to avoid bouncing off the rev limiter, but constantly looking down to see if you're within a specified range when shifting is a recipe for making this whole activity clinical and boring. Regardless of the bike, my shift points change based on conditions. Am I accelerating away from a stop as fast as the bike can go? Obviously, then, it's only shift at the redline on bikes that have a flat or better torque-curve, and if not, note when it tails off, then shift to get back in the power band. Am I stuck behind slowpokes or just want to save gas or take it easy and enjoy the scenery (rare for me on the last, but it happens)? Then shift as early as possible, without lugging the engine when the revs drop for the higher gear.

No need to list specific shift points, as its a process of trial and error, and again, you might hate my shift points and vice versa.

And further, JMO (based on my own butt-dyno), but the shift points on this bike (and many others) change by the particular map you've chosen. It seems to me that sport mode seems to give you a tad more torque all the way to the limiter.
 
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Lugging an engine is as bad as over revving it.
Many engineers would tell you its worse, especially since it's much easier to do. Electronic nannies do all they can to prevent overrevving, but you can bog that thing down all day, if you're (generic "you," not referring to you, @Turtl ) dumb enough to keep doing it. I am always amazed at how some of the H-D brethren love to see how low they can keep the rpm without stalling. I've seen competitions as to how low they can set their idle without killing the bike. I just shake my head.
 
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