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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

Brand new the world of biking and currently on the search for my first bike. At this point in time I'm really just trying to soak up and learn all I can about different bikes that would be a suitable first purchase. Many people have suggested that its better to start off with a used bike, especially for your first, but I'm tempted to start my journey with a bang. I'm really excited to see what you guys have to say about this bike and I will gladly listen to your suggestions and criticisms. Cheers.
 

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Hi - my first bike was a Herald Classic 125 - a good retro looking first bike - after passing A licence test got my Bobber!! I did not find the transition difficult as had put miles on a 650 in training for the test.
 

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Hey guys,

Brand new the world of biking and currently on the search for my first bike. At this point in time I'm really just trying to soak up and learn all I can about different bikes that would be a suitable first purchase. Many people have suggested that its better to start off with a used bike, especially for your first, but I'm tempted to start my journey with a bang. I'm really excited to see what you guys have to say about this bike and I will gladly listen to your suggestions and criticisms. Cheers.
Questions:
Where are you located?
Do you have any experience riding at all, street or dirt?
Do you understand the mechanics of a motor bike (clutch, RPMs, front/rear breaking, etc)
Have you taken a riding course?

If the answer to the last two questions is no, I would suggest a riding course to understand the controls and physics of how a bike works. If you already do, I can't say that the Bobber is a BAD 1st bike at all. Albeit prob higher in hp/tq than others would suggest, but it has a manageable power deliver and great handling for what it is.

The Bobber is the 1st bike I have ever bought, but def not the 1st bike I have ever ridden, so I was not to concerned. And I took the course (woot, 250 Suzuki!).

It's hard to say if this would be a good 1st bike without knowing more background on your scenario.

If you said "I have never sat on a bike, tried clutch control coupled with rear brake in slow speed maneuvering, etc", then I would say any bike of this size is not a good 1st bike.

Bottom line, need more info on your scenario.

Same token...you have great taste for considering this bike!
 

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No one on the internet can or should answer that question for you.

This is a great bike. It’s no VMax but it isn’t a 250 either. Your ability and comfort level are the variables.
 

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I had a weekend course on a Honda 125 thing. some years later about 3 I think i finally got my motorbike license in Switzerland. The rules there are different trust me. But that day I went and rented a Honda hornet (I think) 600cc unrestricted. went up and down a straight road a few times and then off I went, half a day later I returned the bike after only dropping it twice, breaking a clutch lever and having a great day.
I then performed my basic training ( 2 * 4 hrs) on a Ducati monster 1100 on loan from the garage, which I had to ride across town to the practice center before my training even began, very sweaty. Then my final 4hrs on my Ducati monster 620 as it was ready,(I still own this and is pictured in "my garage").
Training is a must.
 

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As an instructor I always advise my students to buy a motorcycle they don't mind dropping...If its your first machine, it is not a question of if, but a question of when you will drop the bike....

If you are to be a successful rider, you will need to be prepared to Practice, Learn, Watch, Read and Listen.

Take your time, make sure you are comfortable on a motorcycle, this is not for everyone, and there is no shame in admitting it's not for you.

When you put it all together its a wonderful experience. You will make fantastic friends and experience real freedom.

As your confidence, and skills grow,you will eventually know when the time is right.... Then you can progress onto a newer or more pristine machine. The Triumph Bobber is an outstanding package, its low, light and has some forgiving safety features. Its also staggeringly pretty and very easy to make your own...

Good Luck !!!

Suzanne
 

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Hey guys,

Brand new the world of biking and currently on the search for my first bike. At this point in time I'm really just trying to soak up and learn all I can about different bikes that would be a suitable first purchase. Many people have suggested that its better to start off with a used bike, especially for your first, but I'm tempted to start my journey with a bang. I'm really excited to see what you guys have to say about this bike and I will gladly listen to your suggestions and criticisms. Cheers.
The following is an article you might want to read as a guide for your first bike.

https://www.bikebandit.com/blog/pos...n=promo_products&utm_source=Sun_012818_BBNews

Chico
 

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Hi and welcome, The A test bike we used was a Honda CBF 600 N .
It had ABS and was so comfortable there not to expensive so yep a good contender for a little while , As for me I past less than a year ago and went from a 125 Provisional , learner to the CBF 600N to learn the A full test. after passing , I went to a BMW R65 and finally the weekend bike the Bonneville Bobber77.
Good luck and be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Questions:
Where are you located?
Do you have any experience riding at all, street or dirt?
Do you understand the mechanics of a motor bike (clutch, RPMs, front/rear breaking, etc)
Have you taken a riding course?

If the answer to the last two questions is no, I would suggest a riding course to understand the controls and physics of how a bike works. If you already do, I can't say that the Bobber is a BAD 1st bike at all. Albeit prob higher in hp/tq than others would suggest, but it has a manageable power deliver and great handling for what it is.

The Bobber is the 1st bike I have ever bought, but def not the 1st bike I have ever ridden, so I was not to concerned. And I took the course (woot, 250 Suzuki!).

It's hard to say if this would be a good 1st bike without knowing more background on your scenario.

If you said "I have never sat on a bike, tried clutch control coupled with rear brake in slow speed maneuvering, etc", then I would say any bike of this size is not a good 1st bike.

Bottom line, need more info on your scenario.

Same token...you have great taste for considering this bike!

I'm from Toronto, Canada and I've completed all my courses/tests. I've ridden a wide array of various dirt bikes and that has led to my interest in getting something for regular use. So I'm certainly familiar with the operation of a bike, but have yet to really experience driving in traffic on a regular basis. It seems to be a recurring thing that experience is more important than bike choice itself. I can certainly see the logic behind buying a bike I don't mind dropping, and that's a wise suggestion.
 

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I'm from Toronto, Canada and I've completed all my courses/tests. I've ridden a wide array of various dirt bikes and that has led to my interest in getting something for regular use. So I'm certainly familiar with the operation of a bike, but have yet to really experience driving in traffic on a regular basis. It seems to be a recurring thing that experience is more important than bike choice itself. I can certainly see the logic behind buying a bike I don't mind dropping, and that's a wise suggestion.
Your circumstance sounds similar to mine. I did have some riding experience (some, not moderate) riding street bikes, and various ones at that. Also many I turned down riding as I knew they were to powerful. I learned all about the bike dropping on dirt bikes!

All things considered, the Bobber is the 1st street bike I have owned. I don't use it to commute it, its purely for evening/weekend enjoyment.

Have you been able to test ride a Bobber? That will be very telling for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I haven't had the opportunity yet as there is plenty of snow still on the ground, so I'm probably going to wait it out until spring. And I just don't think for whatever reason that I'll enjoy the ergonomics of a street/race bike. I have younger friends who ride ricers and they don't exactly express how comfortable their rides are, so that's why I'm leaning more towards a bobber.
 

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Cullen, may I ask how old you are and even more important, are you frequently riding some kind of single lane vehicle?

As an examiner for engoing drivers I have seen a lot of beginners in the last 25 years, and I was told even more unbelievable episodes from their driving school instructors. Cause it was obvious, that the quantity of difficulties increases with the age of the beginners, I did some studies to get a clarification for that.:nerd:

Nobody would deny, that our time of reaction decreases with our age continously. But now actual brain research has shown, that our ability to hold balance depends strongly on our age. Astonishingly you can count the seconds for the time one can stand on one foot without moving it, and by that you can determine his age with a accuracy of +/- 2 years! Furthermore our brain has to keep the stored information as low as possible, cause of the limited storage capacity (mine is limited over average cause of the frequent consuption of beer:grin2:)! From birth to death it is trying to "build highways" allowing easy going and preventing information overload.

For example: If you first time climb a mountain without marked paths, you will frequently have to stop, look around and determine the obviously best way to get to the summit. Second time you will take the same way very likely. The more times you climb this mountain, the "broader" your path will get, and the harder it will get to leave it. Knowing and accepting this lets us understand, that sometimes beginners forget to take their feet from the bike's footrests, when they stop! It happened more than once, that elder beginners discarded their bike ambitions after they were pulled out under their bikes repeatedly!

Normally we will make by far more miles with our cars than with our bikes. The path making behavior of our brain by this makes riding bikes generally difficult!

Imagine the common riding situation: You are driving a curvy road up a hill with medium speed and you are cornering around a slope at a medium tilt angle. Suddently a big, big bus comes across, partly on your lane! Now, the bigger the bus is, the bigger your escape reflex will be. If you are not scared by the bus to much, if you frequently ride bikes consciously and if you are aware, how bikes have to be steered, you are a lucky person! You will move the bar towards the bus, which increases your tilt angle, makes your cornering radius sufficiently smaller and lets you pass the bus. You then can have a beer at the next pub. But otherwise, if your brain is strongly or exclusivly trained on cars, your escape reflex will let you move the bar off the bus, as you would have to driving your car!!! Fatally by this the bike will be forced to decrease its tilt angle immediately. Cause of the then larger turning radius you will hit the bus frontally! Your friends will read in the newspapers next day: Biker died because of his excessive speed. But in truth, your escape reflex and your "car-path" in your brain has killed you!:crying:

So its evident, that the less practice you have on bicycles or scooters, the less should be the weigh, the power and the speed limits of your bike! This will give your brain the time to make the right decissions and to make a new "bike-path"!:smile2:

Werner Wernersen
 

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A lot of good things have been said here, if you start biking a used bike can be a good start as you will drop the bike now and then. On the other hand a new bike will give you more confidence and is more reliable in most cases. My lady partner took her first test at the age 55 (!) and started with a brand new Ducati Scrambler. She wanted a Triumph Scrambler but at that time those did not have ABS which is a complete no go for a beginner. And yes she dropped the bike about five times but apart from a broken clutch lever nothing serious happend. A new bike will start every time, no break downs etc.. When I was younger I could only afford used bikes and more than once they broke down and wouldn't start, pretty annoying.

Regarding power: if you do a lot of country roads a bike with less tha 60 hp can be dangerous as you tend to overtake cars and you need some power for that. After a 25 year long break due to family duties I re-started with a BMW thumper with 53 hp and my mates always said: your bike is dangerous you do not have enough power to overtake and they were right. Things changed dramatically as I switched to a Tiger 800 which has the power needed but the bike as far from being a beast like most sport bikes. From the low rev torque the Bobber has its a perfect bike for country roads enough power to overtake the cars. I have the Bobber just three weeks now and the weather over here is too bad for riding but I'll now the bike is perfect for the purposes I bought it for.

Apart from the licence test a security training is essential, I have done three since I went back on bikes some 10 years ago and this improved my riding very much. I am faster and safer now.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Cullen, may I ask how old you are and even more important, are you frequently riding some kind of single lane vehicle?

As an examiner for engoing drivers I have seen a lot of beginners in the last 25 years, and I was told even more unbelievable episodes from their driving school instructors. Cause it was obvious, that the quantity of difficulties increases with the age of the beginners, I did some studies to get a clarification for that.:nerd:

Nobody would deny, that our time of reaction decreases with our age continously. But now actual brain research has shown, that our ability to hold balance depends strongly on our age. Astonishingly you can count the seconds for the time one can stand on one foot without moving it, and by that you can determine his age with a accuracy of +/- 2 years! Furthermore our brain has to keep the stored information as low as possible, cause of the limited storage capacity (mine is limited over average cause of the frequent consuption of beer:grin2:)! From birth to death it is trying to "build highways" allowing easy going and preventing information overload.

For example: If you first time climb a mountain without marked paths, you will frequently have to stop, look around and determine the obviously best way to get to the summit. Second time you will take the same way very likely. The more times you climb this mountain, the "broader" your path will get, and the harder it will get to leave it. Knowing and accepting this lets us understand, that sometimes beginners forget to take their feet from the bike's footrests, when they stop! It happened more than once, that elder beginners discarded their bike ambitions after they were pulled out under their bikes repeatedly!

Normally we will make by far more miles with our cars than with our bikes. The path making behavior of our brain by this makes riding bikes generally difficult!

Imagine the common riding situation: You are driving a curvy road up a hill with medium speed and you are cornering around a slope at a medium tilt angle. Suddently a big, big bus comes across, partly on your lane! Now, the bigger the bus is, the bigger your escape reflex will be. If you are not scared by the bus to much, if you frequently ride bikes consciously and if you are aware, how bikes have to be steered, you are a lucky person! You will move the bar towards the bus, which increases your tilt angle, makes your cornering radius sufficiently smaller and lets you pass the bus. You then can have a beer at the next pub. But otherwise, if your brain is strongly or exclusivly trained on cars, your escape reflex will let you move the bar off the bus, as you would have to driving your car!!! Fatally by this the bike will be forced to decrease its tilt angle immediately. Cause of the then larger turning radius you will hit the bus frontally! Your friends will read in the newspapers next day: Biker died because of his excessive speed. But in truth, your escape reflex and your "car-path" in your brain has killed you!:crying:

So its evident, that the less practice you have on bicycles or scooters, the less should be the weigh, the power and the speed limits of your bike! This will give your brain the time to make the right decissions and to make a new "bike-path"!:smile2:

Werner Wernersen
I'm currently 29 years old and will be hitting the big 3-0 next month. So I think its safe to say that I'm not an elder beginner aha. I'm out riding my dirt bike on a fairly consistent basis, but that doesn't include much time on the road. Usually just what's required to get to the trails and back, with no real highway time. Thanks for sharing your various insights and suggestions, ill definitely keep them in mind when shopping around.
 

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Highway for some new riders I know has been nerve wrecking which is funny because for me that was the easiest part, instead it was city riding that scared me... all those horrible drivers that can do anything at any time that can result in very bad things for a rider caught up in the middle of it!
 
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