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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question on the cruise control operation for anyone that has this option.

If the cruise control is activated, can you remove your right hand from the throttle or does doing so deactivate the cruise control when the throttle is allowed to return to the closed position?
 

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You can take your hand off and rest it on your lap. The bike will stay at the speed you chose.

I have a question on the cruise control operation for anyone that has this option.

If the cruise control is activated, can you remove your right hand from the throttle or does doing so deactivate the cruise control when the throttle is allowed to return to the closed position?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Ok. Good to know. I looked at the instructions and they stated that the cruise control would cancel if the throttled rolled forward. I hoped this didn’t mean that the mode would cancel if you allowed the throttle return to the closed position if you released the grip.
 

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Ok. Good to know. I looked at the instructions and they stated that the cruise control would cancel if the throttled rolled forward. I hoped this didn’t mean that the mode would cancel if you allowed the throttle return to the closed position if you released the grip.
The throttle on the Bobber is electronic (ride-by-wire), and is basically a rheostat (think volume knob). There has to be some spring tension in there, otherwise the bike would stay at what ever speed at which the throttle currently positioned; you'd be unable to decelerate if you let go of the grip. As for the Cruise Control, when you activate it, it takes over the function of the grip and holds the speed via the ECU, but also holds the throttle grip at that particular spot allowing you to release the grip without it closing. Rolling off the throttle overrides the CC function and tells the ECU you're slowing down and to dis-engage. Same with activating front & rear brakes and clutch.

If the CC on the Bobber is anything like the CC on my Tiger, just rolling off the throttle or engaging the brakes tends to dump the speed off rather quickly. There's no subtlety to it at all. Tap the brakes and you lurch forward. I've learned to roll on a little throttle to pick up 1 or 2 mph and then tap the brakes or hit the button. Doing that I never feel the hard dis-engage anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok. I knew it was fly by wire on the throttle but actually didn’t picture the cruise control keeping the throttle tube in an open position. I thought it would just snap back and the throttle bodies would open and operate via the bike’s ecm.

Seeing that the throttle tube remains in an open position even if released, it makes sense why the instructions read that way and how the throttle can be used to cancel it.

I really want it now.
 

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Ok. I knew it was fly by wire on the throttle but actually didn’t picture the cruise control keeping the throttle tube in an open position. I thought it would just snap back and the throttle bodies would open and operate via the bike’s ecm.

Seeing that the throttle tube remains in an open position even if released, it makes sense why the instructions read that way and how the throttle can be used to cancel it.

I really want it now.
Cruise control is an excellent accessory and worth having.
Much like the heated grips :wink2:
 

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Ok. I knew it was fly by wire on the throttle but actually didn’t picture the cruise control keeping the throttle tube in an open position. I thought it would just snap back and the throttle bodies would open and operate via the bike’s ecm.

Seeing that the throttle tube remains in an open position even if released, it makes sense why the instructions read that way and how the throttle can be used to cancel it.

I really want it now.
It would seem that there's a little confusion here. :smile2:

There is nothing in the throttle grip housing on the handlebar that would hold your throttle grip tube in an open position. After activating the CC, the spring inside will move the grip tube forward to it's idle position when you release the pressure on the grip. You can then sit back, relax both hands, and enjoy the ride.
To de-activate the CC you have to physically turn the throttle forward, it will then also return back to the idle position. The brakes and clutch will also, of course, de-activate the CC.
Small servo motors control the position of the butterfly valves in the throttle bodies, to hold the chosen speed.

Hope this helps.
Cheers!
mike
 

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That was my thought as well Mike, but not having cruise control on mine I didn't want to chime in. I recall years ago on American gas guzzlers the cruise control did work by holding the throttle open. However this was back when cars had carburettors. With fuel injection and an ecu my understanding is the ecu tells the engine how much fuel to inject. Effectively it bypasses the throttle once cruise is engaged and the throttle would return as you say to the idle position.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It all makes sense to me now that I have heard from others that have it. Just in my research of it, the instructions mentioned that it would deactivate when the grip is rolled forward. It seemed to me that grip would roll forward as soon as you released it.....which didn’t make much sense to me.

It seemed logical that it should work even when released, but I didn’t know if some odd safety function was coming into play.

It sounds like an option that is coming in my near future.
 
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