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Discussion Starter #1
Swapping out to a new chain. When reading the handbook it says the chain should have a slack of 26-33mm. Is the slack measured by the total movement up and down or just the measurement pushing the chain upward? I've seen videos showing both.
 

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Chain measurement is the distance of the movement from pulling slightly down to slightly up taken at the same place on the chain for both at the closest to middle of the chain as possible. Meaning, use the top or bottom of the chain for your measuring. IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #5
So far I have 1” upward movement and about 2/8” downward using about the midpoint between the front and rear sprocket using the lower part of the chain. I’m due for 500 mile service so the dealer will probably look at it again anyway.
 

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Chain adjustment is very subjective. When you have over 100 links with the friction of the orings, bushings and type of lube used, some lubes are sticky which will really mess with adjustment, it is virtually impossible to get the adjustment perfect. Don't sweat over the details, adjust at mid point between sprockets and get it as close as possible then ride. I check mine every week or so and only adjust when I think it is getting "a little loose", very subjective...:cool:
 

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Chain adjustment is very subjective. When you have over 100 links with the friction of the orings, bushings and type of lube used, some lubes are sticky which will really mess with adjustment, it is virtually impossible to get the adjustment perfect. Don't sweat over the details, adjust at mid point between sprockets and get it as close as possible then ride. I check mine every week or so and only adjust when I think it is getting "a little loose", very subjective...:cool:
I agree. Chain adjustment is hardly rocket science but some seem to greatly over think it. The chain likes to be at a certain tension and that may seem loose for some depending on the bike and how the swingarm angle sits at rest. Most people tighten their chains too tight only to find that it keeps wearing and settling back to its happy spot.

The reason your chain needs that slack when sitting on a stand is that the rear axle is not at its farthest from the countershaft. That happens probably midway through the shock stroke. I guess the most accurate way to set chain adjustment would be to remove the rear shock and pivot the swingarm to where the axle and countershaft are farthest apart. At this point the chain should be at its tightest but allowable tension. If it was a long travel suspension bike, the chain may look quite loose when the shock was in place and the bike was sitting.

Just remember your chain needs slack. Don’t let it get overly loose, but by all means don’t get it too tight. Just do that and make sure your adjustment distances are the same for each side. After that, just go ride.
 

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If I dont have a torque wrench to accurately measure the force used on the wheel nut when re-tightening after adjustment. Any tips on how much to tighten?
 
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