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Discussion Starter #1
Many of you from other forums will remember that just about this time last year some of the Bobber critics were saying that a Bobber was something you build, not buy! Others like me pointed out that 10 years ago a Cafe Racer was something you built.

I have seen several Gorgeous Bobber "builds" lately! I can not speak for all but here is my story.

Most of my mods were "bolt on." But a keen observer will note that thru my bikes several versions, there was electrical wiring, painting, leather work, and even a saws-all and welding were employed! Lately even a grinder was used with a cutoff wheel on my brand new bike!
Parts were used out of the garage and some parts were grafted off other bikes, just like a back yard build!

I did most of the work my self and some with help from friends, just like a backyard build. I didn't keep track but I probably have less then fifteen hours into it and quite a few beers, but don't forget the friends time! I am sure that the backyard builds of the 60's and 70's took longer, but Triumph gave us a much better start now.

I have never seen another bike similar to mine and don't expect to! So what does the forum say? It it just making it their own or are these "builds"
 

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I think that most would agree that true builds are technically total workups, i.e., getting components separately and putting them imaginatively together in your mind's eye, then physically.

But there's no shame in buying a Bobber, and modifying it by bolt-ons or doing some real modifications, as imagination (and money) allow. After all, that was one of the design specs, viz., to allow others to make it highly customize-able. It really isn't your bike unless SOMETHING is different than when you took it off the showroom floor. And compared to a true build, this way is a much safer route given the engineering that was invested by Triumph. The base is solid with great handling and looks.

Back in the late 70s, having chopped a '74 Superglide by putting its engine in a '56 hardtail frame, collecting a zillion parts catalogs, and dreaming of how I wanted it to look; then, going to swap meets, and making friends who could fill in the many knowledge gaps I had, getting things chromed, putting it all together, getting it registered, and finally riding it (then working out the kinks), it was certainly an experience I wouldn't trade--especially the creative part, and the creative problem-solving part, of it.

Having said that, in the process of building and the results of my efforts, I developed a profound appreciation of mechanical engineers who design and build stock bikes. While my efforts proved successful in doing what I had dreamed, i.e. build something that I'd conceived, things weren't completely solid. It handled and ran OK, looked great, but had its quirks.

Not so with the Bobber. The thing's rock solid, and if I were doing the design there is not much I'd do differently with the looks. Ain't much, IMHO, that needs modified. It performs superbly and it looks great as is (the real reason--aside from the creative urge--that one would choose to modify). I'll admit, though, that got my creative thrills off chopping the Harley and I don't now desire any major modifications...just yet.

However, today it's a lot safer to buy a Bobber and modify it to your whims--which I wholeheartedly encourage and appreciate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
p5 (2).jpg

Someone on a different forum asked so here is what I remember in no particular order:

1. Apehanger handlebars grafted off a Harley, exact bends of the Triumph part that wasn't available until almost 5 months later!

2. Extended wiring for above!

3. Extended clutch and front brakeline

4. True Bobber shortened rear fender

5. Rear turn signals relocated, Multi function light kit installed

6. License plate mount relocated to left swingarm

7. Statement seat purchased and redone in Saddle Tan

8. Stock seat redone in Saddle Tan

9. Tool Bag grafted off Harley and redone in Saddle Tane

10. Swingarm bag grafted off another bike and redone in Saddle Tan

10. Catalytic Converter removed

11. X- pipe installed

12. Original pipes cut opened, gutted and welded back together

13. Shot gun pipes installed, in place of gutted stockers

14. Air cleaner covers painted matte black

15. TB covers plated in Copper

16. Rear Reflecter bracket ground off rear fender

17. Next Headlite ring Coppered, Never Finished!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Devil Dog, I am not comparing to a "true build" I am trying to compare to an old school back yard Bobber where things were just basically cutoff. The real question stemming from those critics who said the Bobber would not sell because it wasn't "built" by owner!

I too went the build route putting a 96" S&S in a Softail frame.
 

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Devil Dog, I am not comparing to a "true build" I am trying to compare to an old school back yard Bobber where things were just basically cutoff. The real question stemming from those critics who said the Bobber would not sell because it wasn't "built" by owner!

I too went the build route putting a 96" S&S in a Softail frame.
Nice picture. I'll have do dig out mine and figure how to upload it.

Well to your question which I misunderstood: reckon we proved them wrong! :)
 

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Building a Chop is a totally different animal, buying a frame, bodging in an engine, spending a week trying to align the chain, mono or twin shock, another 2 months of fiddling about and on and on and on then even when it's built, will I get the stamp on the form from the inspector to get it on the road and if I do, do I get a Reg niumber from that donated headstock or am I going to get a Q plate and an insurance nightmare?

Buggerit, I'll buy a factory bike and mod it the way I want.
 
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