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Discussion Starter #1
I installed my Sleeper Pro slip-ons and a Booster Plug last Saturday. The instructions for the Booster Plug say to place the sensor near the headlight for best performance but the wiring is about 18 inches short of being able to do that so I placed it on the rear subframe just under the seat. While riding Saturday afternoon I placed my hand in the area of the sensor and felt a lot of warm air from the engine flowing in that area. That tells me it is not the optimal position, especially when summer temps get into the mid 90 to 100 degrees as is common here.

The instructions also say that if needed, wire can be spliced in the sensor lead; so, this evening I did just that. I now have the sensor just behind the headlight. I'm sure the cooler the air hitting the sensor, the better. Seems the manufacturer could make the sensor wire a little longer to begin with but I guess on some Triumphs it is good as is.
 

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I installed my Sleeper Pro slip-ons and a Booster Plug last Saturday. The instructions for the Booster Plug say to place the sensor near the headlight for best performance but the wiring is about 18 inches short of being able to do that so I placed it on the rear subframe just under the seat. While riding Saturday afternoon I placed my hand in the area of the sensor and felt a lot of warm air from the engine flowing in that area. That tells me it is not the optimal position, especially when summer temps get into the mid 90 to 100 degrees as is common here.

The instructions also say that if needed, wire can be spliced in the sensor lead; so, this evening I did just that. I now have the sensor just behind the headlight. I'm sure the cooler the air hitting the sensor, the better. Seems the manufacturer could make the sensor wire a little longer to begin with but I guess on some Triumphs it is good as is.
I ordered mine today and would be curious to know/see how you routed it as I intend on extending the wire and feeding the sensor to the same location. Where you able to hide it well?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I fished the wire through behind the carbs (oops, I mean the fuel injection units..LOL), then zip tied it in several places to the overflow hose that runs along the left side of the fuel tank just behind the tank seam. It then emerges near the steering head along with all the other wires and cables, through the bracket that holds them to the steering head and the silver sensor is zip tied to one of the wires behind the headlight. You cant see it under the tank unless you really try by looking underneath the tank and it blends in with all the other wires at the steering head. Just be sure to move the handlebars to full stop in both directions to make sure it doesn't get in a bind as things move.

When I have to lift the tank for any service, I'll then re-route it along the wire harness that runs under the tank. I see no reason to lift the tank just to do that however since it is completely hidden as is.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ysosio, I haven't tried yet, is it possible to remove the rear bolts holding the tank on and simply lift it at the rear enough to fish the wire along the main wire harness without completly removing the tank?
 

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You might be able to do it, but it would likely be pretty difficult. In the pic I posted showing the sensor behind the headlight, you can see the thick plastic loom holder on the right side of the pic. This holder is roughly 15" long and has 4 clips. I undid the clips and placed the sensor wire in there with care not to pinch it anywhere. Depending on how high the tank will lift up with just the back bolts removed, you might be able to do the same although you'll likely need an extra pair of hands to hold the tank up out of your way while you work.
 

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You might be able to do it, but it would likely be pretty difficult. In the pic I posted showing the sensor behind the headlight, you can see the thick plastic loom holder on the right side of the pic. This holder is roughly 15" long and has 4 clips. I undid the clips and placed the sensor wire in there with care not to pinch it anywhere. Depending on how high the tank will lift up with just the back bolts removed, you might be able to do the same although you'll likely need an extra pair of hands to hold the tank up out of your way while you work.
I have not looked at what the level of effort is to take the tank off....is it a pain?, or simply a couple bolts, couple wiring harnesses and fuel line unclip?
 

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So after all that extending of the wires and rerouting has anyone actually noticed a difference in the bike running smoother with the slightly cooler air passing over the censor ? I have my plug towards the rear of the bike now.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rain moved in again so Ihaven't been able to ride since extending the wire. I expect that it will have the most effect in a couple of months when I get into summer temps.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Rain finally stopped for a while this evening so I was able to do a short run. With the sensor on the rear subframe, I never got any deceleration popping but there was some burbling that came with engine braking. With the sensor in the cooler airflow behind the headlight I didn't notice any of the burbling anymore. The final test will come in a couple of months when the summer temps hit. So, my totally unscientific testing says there was some improvement gained by moving the sensor from the engine heated air flow at the rear subframe to the fresh cool air behind the headlight.
 

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i located the sensor at the upside down "L" in the frame right under the seat, it seems to get sufficiently cooler air there to do it's job just fine. i've noticed a difference with it located there giving better all-around performance (although that's hard to quantify) and mainly no popping on deceleration. i'd recommend locating it there, easy to do with a couple of zip ties, and allows it do to it's job.

sorry i can't take a picture of it there right now, the bike is at the mech getting some Gasser pipes installed.
 

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i located the sensor at the upside down "L" in the frame right under the seat, it seems to get sufficiently cooler air there to do it's job just fine. i've noticed a difference with it located there giving better all-around performance (although that's hard to quantify) and mainly no popping on deceleration. i'd recommend locating it there, easy to do with a couple of zip ties, and allows it do to it's job.

sorry i can't take a picture of it there right now, the bike is at the mech getting some Gasser pipes installed.
Woot on the Gassers! Be curious to hear how the plug works during warmer weather in the location it's in.

I full intend to put it up near the headlamp, just to one and done it.
 

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mainly no popping on deceleration.
That's one of the reasons i put straight thru pipes on, the pop, bang, burble on the overrun!
 

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Cat in place, BC Tips, get a nice lump of noise if i'm harsh on engine braking, not as much as I'd like which is why im seriously considering the Verex downpipes.
 

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Because im a terrible mechanic, i'm great at ripping stuff apart but can never get it back together again, don't want to drop £180 quid in labour to a dealer to fit a £100 part for me!
 
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