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I'm posting this tale as it might help someone else in the future:
Yesterday I was planning on a day ride on the Bobber. Pulled her out of the garage after checking tire pressure, started the starting sequence, turn key to "on", light and instrument lights up, depress clutch lever, press start button, nothing happens except all lights go off in a nano second. Tried again, nothing, she's dead. Decided to defer looking into the issue and returned her to the garage. Pulled out my Tiger 800, which started like a clock and off I went, nice 90 F degree day.
In the Evening I started to check the fuses, all good. Took the battery out of it's "cave", big pain in the butt. Got 12.8 volts, not bad. Connected a trickle charger/ optimate after 2 minutes went to green and measured 13.4 volts. Checked with a load tester, it read 12.8. Decided to sleep on this issue.
After some pondering prior to falling asleep I had an idea, re-connected battery, this is the part that might be helpful. Try the spare key.:surprise: She fired right up. I called the dealer and was told that it's not unusual for the key to loose the code from it's memory. Hooray for electronics.

Chico
 

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After some pondering prior to falling asleep I had an idea, re-connected battery, this is the part that might be helpful. Try the spare key.:surprise: She fired right up. I called the dealer and was told that it's not unusual for the key to loose the code from it's memory. Hooray for electronics.

Chico

Thanks Chico. Lucky for you being still at home. Would have been a huge bummer if on the road far away. :frown2: Guess I will start tucking the spare key somewhere for each ride.
 

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That happened to me once when I was riding a rented BMW. The BMW would not recognize the key. The tour company ended up giving me another bike. It was a giant pain in the rear.

I'm glad your problem happened at your home.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yes, it was fortunate that it happened at home. The Triumph dealer will reprogram the key. The strange part of this story is that after trying the spare key I tried the original key and it worked. The new bikes/cars have strange gremlins hiding in unknown places.

Chico
 

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On my 2014 Tiger this happened more than once. The ignition would get hot from the sun and the bike wouldn't recognize the key. Trick with the Tiger was to pour water on it to cool it down. Had to do that more than once. Also have several occasions where it wouldn't prompt the fuel pump (you can really hear them on the Tiger) and I would pull out and reinstall until it got over its acting up. Never had to fiddle with getting a key reprogrammed , just learned to look out for its odd behavior.
 

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This happened to me the other day when I was out running errands. Took the key back out to make sure I hadn't turned it too far and put it back in. All of the lights came on like they should, but the start button failed to bring the bike to life. Finally, I sheepishly put the kickstand up and she fired right up! It ain't easy getting old (and sometimes forgetful)...lol
 

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It ain't easy getting old (and sometimes forgetful)...lol
Aaaahhhh... a bit out of context, but let me share my story to make you feel better:

Be me. Test ride Bobber. All great. Buy Bobber. Pick it up. Wow.
At the first intersection when putting the left foot down, hit the sidestand and instantly kill the engine in city traffic. Sheepish smile (under the helmet), put the stand back up, start, lalalala.

A minute later pull into the gas station to fill up the tank, put her in first gear before stopping. Fill her up. Turn on the ignition, hit the start button --- oh. Nope, that's not start. That is the mode button now. Start her up. Aaah yeah. Now how to get back to road mode? Mode button does not do anything?
Aaaah, maybe because I have the clutch pulled, let it go. Plummet forward. Still had her in first gear.

Looks like all my bike riding experience went down the drain in those few minutes. Embarrassing.

The "kick sidestand down when stopping" thing happened many more times in the first few days, until I learnt to move my foot further out when taking it from the footpeg.

Tom
 

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This happened to me the other day when I was out running errands. Took the key back out to make sure I hadn't turned it too far and put it back in. All of the lights came on like they should, but the start button failed to bring the bike to life. Finally, I sheepishly put the kickstand up and she fired right up! It ain't easy getting old (and sometimes forgetful)...lol
All this "health & safety" stuff to stop you hurting yourself :rolleyes::rolleyes:. back in the "old" (and not so old )days you learnt to ride by someone showing you how to from their experiance, and the first time you forgot to put the side stand up...well you wouldn`t forget again.
Too much electrics= too many problems.
 

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All this "health & safety" stuff to stop you hurting yourself :rolleyes::rolleyes:. back in the "old" (and not so old )days you learnt to ride by someone showing you how to from their experiance, and the first time you forgot to put the side stand up...well you wouldn`t forget again.
Too much electrics= too many problems.
Well said indeed Bofor,

One of the reasons I love the Bobber is it's vintage/old fashioned look. I'm somewhat of a Luddite, so it's a learning curve getting used to all these electric gismos. One of the reasons I will never have a new car. I like things to be simple. I love my Bobber but I would love it to be less 'electrical' and still can't work my way around the 'modes'.

I know, I'm feeling a little old..:crying:

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Well said indeed Bofor,

One of the reasons I love the Bobber is it's vintage/old fashioned look. I'm somewhat of a Luddite, so it's a learning curve getting used to all these electric gismos. One of the reasons I will never have a new car. I like things to be simple. I love my Bobber but I would love it to be less 'electrical' and still can't work my way around the 'modes'.

I know, I'm feeling a little old..:crying:

Cheerio,

Roy
Hi Roy
I`m old as well, i can remember fitting a new head gasket to a BSA Starfire...no chance now with the bikes
Getting back on track with this how many use the "kill" switch to stop the engine ?...then forget to switch it to "run" and then DOHH..lightbulb moment whenit wont start?
I always stop it on the key only, thats what its for.
 

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Yes me too,

I keep it simple and just use the start button as a start button, don't even think of it as a kill switch.

I recall when those kill switches turned up my mates would be quite adept at overtaking me at speed, leaning over and 'killing' my bike at speed. Bloody terrified me once or twice I can tell you.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Kickstand, mode button stories just too funny (not that I haven’t done those mind you :):)

Chico, thanks for this posting. I always carry my spare if only in case I misplace or lose the original. Now I have another reason.
 

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I always stop it with the key only, thats what its for.
Interestingly, when I first got the Bobber I questioned this. I read in the manual that you should use the key to turn off the bike (no mention of using the kill switch). I questioned this as I always use the kill switch on my Indian and had previously done this with Harleys. But, on the forum I was also told to use the key. So I continue to do so. I thought maybe the difference was American vs. British (it’s not, of course) sort of like have the Triumph key on the right side and the Indian on the left (my preference) which drives me a little crazy. But that’s another story.
 

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I'm posting this tale as it might help someone else in the future:
Yesterday I was planning on a day ride on the Bobber. Pulled her out of the garage after checking tire pressure, started the starting sequence, turn key to "on", light and instrument lights up, depress clutch lever, press start button, nothing happens except all lights go off in a nano second. Tried again, nothing, she's dead. Decided to defer looking into the issue and returned her to the garage. Pulled out my Tiger 800, which started like a clock and off I went, nice 90 F degree day.
In the Evening I started to check the fuses, all good. Took the battery out of it's "cave", big pain in the butt. Got 12.8 volts, not bad. Connected a trickle charger/ optimate after 2 minutes went to green and measured 13.4 volts. Checked with a load tester, it read 12.8. Decided to sleep on this issue.
After some pondering prior to falling asleep I had an idea, re-connected battery, this is the part that might be helpful. Try the spare key.:surprise: She fired right up. I called the dealer and was told that it's not unusual for the key to loose the code from it's memory. Hooray for electronics.

Chico
Something similar just happened to me ,only I was on the road for some reason after about ten minutes of anguish it decided to kick over and run. Only with my situation the pcm lit up the check engine icon,which I erased trying to get the battery out,so I'll never know the code,Bike ran great for the remainder of the journey and hasn't failed to start since. Still worry about the starting safety circuit, Did you light up the engine light. I've got the Haynes manual good to 2017 mine is 2019 lots of different stuff barely touches on the Bobber. .Haynes manual is only one step above British military toilet paper. Dosen't really go into any kind of diagnostics. Guess I'll start carrying two keys also, Thanks Ray Rangerf
 

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Something similar just happened to me ,only I was on the road for some reason after about ten minutes of anguish it decided to kick over and run. Only with my situation the pcm lit up the check engine icon,which I erased trying to get the battery out,so I'll never know the code,Bike ran great for the remainder of the journey and hasn't failed to start since. Still worry about the starting safety circuit, Did you light up the engine light. I've got the Haynes manual good to 2017 mine is 2019 lots of different stuff barely touches on the Bobber. .Haynes manual is only one step above British military toilet paper. Dosen't really go into any kind of diagnostics. Guess I'll start carrying two keys also, Thanks Ray Rangerf
 
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