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Discussion Starter #1
Fellow Bobber riders,

I've now seen more than one post relating to a member's Bobber/Speedmaster failing to start eventually resulting in a battery issue that needs replacement.

In an attempt to circumvent such an issue I'm now thinking what would be the best mileage to replace the battery.

This may be a shot in the dark but thought there was no harm in starting a thread just to see if there was any information that could be extrapolated.

So can I ask at what mileage did your battery fail?

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Mileage has very little to do with it. How the battery is stored and how often the bike is ridden are much more important. I have seen batteries that are always on a good brand of tender go eight years. Bikes that are stored in the winter months and not maintained properly are lucky to get 3 years. I would say that if you do a good job of maintaining your battery replace it at the beginning of every 4th season and you probably won't have an issue!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that mate.

Yes I'm aways of that and wasn't implying that mileage has anything to actually do with battery life span, I should have made that clearer.

I was just working on an over simplistic theory that all things being equal if one purchased a new Bobber and remembered what milage the battery failed and if something similar happened to a few riders, then that might give a heads up to other riders that, that may be something to look out for.

But as mentioned, this may be a shot in the dark.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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Roy, I took delivery of my Robber in April 2018. I put 5,200 miles on it last year and had the dealership store it over the winter. They removed the battery and stored it indoors on a tender until I picked it back up in April of this year. I put another 2,500 miles on it before the battery died, so a total of 7,700 miles. I never connected it to a Battery Tender at home. Now that I've replace the battery, I plug it into the tender every time I get off of it in the hope that it'll last a lot longer.

I've got the battery below "saved to cart" on Amazon, so when the time comes to replace the current battery I'll be able to place a quick order and get a new one within a day or 2.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0798VHL6L/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_2?smid=A18FJ6DZ5DLR7S&psc=1

Good luck with yours! If you've put it on the battery tender regularly, you'll likely get more longevity out of the original battery than I did.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for that @ysoslo,

Good information there. I don't put mine on a tender as I'm riding it every day. I'm up to around 6,500 miles on my bike and was thinking I would put a new batter on (as a precaution) at 7,500. It would seem from you initial response that may be a good way to go.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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My Corvette battery lasted fifteen years, always on a battery tender. My HD battery was replaced after nine years even though it worked fine just as a precaution, also always on a tender.

Chico
 

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You can't predict some battery failure modes, years ago Yuasa had a batch of batteries for bikes that failed with breaks in cell-cell connection...
 

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For me seems who uses battery tender, their batteries die ... . I never(Daytona 675 and now BB) used one(i bought it and still in box) and battery is ok.
I have 27k km on odo now, we have 5 month cold winter. I leave battery on bike and ca run bike 4 - 5 x 10 min during winter, thats all - it started without problems on spring.
So i don't see anypoint to use battery tender by myself or take battery off the bike .

Only the case when batteries(3x, before i checked voltage) were burnt by Dyatona 675 was when their famous voltage regulator failed and output voltage was over 25v, that was fixed by using aftermarket MOSFET voltage regulator.
 

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I've had mine for less than a month (3 weeks) only have 740 miles and the battery failed to crank today after a short ride. It is kinda cold at 55 but three weeks with plenty of rides being 50+Miles seemed like short time to crap out. Thought at first it might be a key issue eith it not reading properly because the light and hazards still funtioned. I was able to get it going with my legs while seated and drop the clutch to get it started becaue of a small slope in the parking lot. Might not be the battery but that click sounded like the tale tale sign of low amps . Maybe its just the leads though they seemed tight and clean when I took the cover off at the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for your update on this.

I think I should give an update myself.

I'm just short of 10,000 miles and a little while ago had some heated grips fitted. My stock battery had (I'm pleased to say) been flawless from new. Not one single issue. However as it was coming up on 10k I thought I would take the opportunity and have a new one fitted while doing the heated grips.

I hope this next one works as well as the last.

Cheerio,

Roy
 

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I started to write this before this morning's upgrade...

There's no point in replacing a battery without cause... How do you determine whether there is cause? You MUST HAVE a digital multimeter, and no it doesn't have to be expensive because you are interested in differences rather than absolute values.

How to check? First put the bike on a charger and when it indicates fully charged, disconnect. After an hour to allow the battery to settle, remove the battery cover, and peel back the positive connection cover (red - and it's the only one you can see) turn the multimeter on to 20V scale, place the black lead from the meter on the earth strap (socket head bolt with ring terminal and thickish black lead running to it) and the red lead on the peeled back connection.

You should see a voltage of 12.8V. If you see 12.7/12.9 don't worry. If the battery is showing down to 12.3V or less, it's almost toast, and probably needs replacing. At this point also check the tightness of both the +ve (red) terminal AND the socket head screw where you've had the black probe.

As battery condition drops, when you turn the ignition on all sorts of stuff starts up (fuel pump,lights etc) and any current draw will reduce the voltage of the battery even more, and when you press the start button, the current draw may take the battery instantaneously down to as low as 8V, but it will recover quickly.

Don't rely on the alternator to fully charge the battery,it may only take it up to 85% fully charged.
 

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I second the bit about alternators not fully charging batteries. The older dynamoes would fully charge a battery but alternators don't. In fact if you start with a flat battery and run for over 100 miles the alternator probably won't recharge anywhere near 85%. If you check most batteries on vehicles these days they will start the engine just fine but they still won't be at full charge. I have CTEK chragers for both bikes and they stay connected whilst in the garage.

You can never tell how long a battery will last - regular use and charging helps. My car battery is 20 years old, though with this cold weather it is just beginning to show signs of being weak.
 

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Took my bike in and the acid retention plug on the battery had popped up and the electrolyte acid solution leaked out as well as into other parts of the batteries casing . Also they said the ground wire was way too loose. Their explanation was whoever prepped the bike did it in a hurry or without proper know how. Had to get a whole new unit installed 4 hours for a charge too. Got it replaced under warranty without having to pay labor so I wasn't too upset. Glad to know i can push start the bobber in a pinch, wasnt sure if the bikes electronics would let me at first but it was easier then my old truck by a mile.
 

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Took my bike in and the acid retention plug on the battery had popped up and the electrolyte acid solution leaked out as well as into other parts of the batteries casing . Also they said the ground wire was way too loose. Their explanation was whoever prepped the bike did it in a hurry or without proper know how. Had to get a whole new unit installed 4 hours for a charge too. Got it replaced under warranty without having to pay labor so I wasn't too upset. Glad to know i can push start the bobber in a pinch, wasnt sure if the bikes electronics would let me at first but it was easier then my old truck by a mile.
Did the electrolyte cause any damage?

Chico
 

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Just replaced my OEM battery last night with a BANSHEE from Amazon. Perfect fit. Half the price of a dealership YUASA battery.

For those that buy batteries online, if you could do a solid and leave feedback which bike you put the battery in and if it fits (or not). Very useful for others doing research.

 

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That's a VERY cheap price. A little low on specs but will do, excellent warranty. I get my batteries from Batterymart.com.

Chico
 

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Replacement battery died about a month later with 1500 miles placed on it in that time period. Went to the dealership to have it replaced again and the third yuasa battery was dead out of the box. Just wouldnt hold a charge even after 3 hours charging. They gave me a different brand I can't remember now... got a tender yesterday but with all the riding I do I dont think that was the issue at all. 50 miles a day 6 days a week, those batteries shouldnt have failed. Ive heard bad batteries do usually come in sets from production so maybe just a fluke.
 
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