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Have seen a couple posts where the direction/tread pattern was in question on the rear tire, so was curious and looked at mine.

In the other posts that were questioning the installation of the rear tire, it was stated that the tread pattern/grooves are to move water away from the middle of the tire to the edge. Naturally understandable, and the 1st part of the groove to make contact with the pavement is more centered to the tire, then flares out to the edge.

However, it appears that the inverse of this is true on the front tire groove pattern. Is this so that while leaning on wet pavement and the tire is on the "side" it draws the water inward and is simply flung off from the center of the tire?

Arrows point in the correct rolling direction (hard to see on front tire) (all pics taken from right side if standing at the back looking forward).

I am very familiar with car tires, but not bike tires...
 

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Yes, apparently the tread points in different directions for front and rear.


I dunno if this helps explain why: Link


That suggests the tyre direction is more to do with the overlap during construction of the tyre and has more to do with the driving v braking forces than water dispersal. I'm not sure if that explains why the tread pattern itself is in a different direction though. :confused:
 

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I would assume that because the rear tire does all of the pushing while the front tire does most of the stopping, the forces are exactly opposite. Maybe that is the reason for opposite tread patterns.
 

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That is a part of what the article said. I guess in some ways it's a common misconception regarding the tread vs water for bike tires.
 

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I would assume that because the rear tire does all of the pushing while the front tire does most of the stopping, the forces are exactly opposite. Maybe that is the reason for opposite tread patterns.
This is indeed the reason.
A few years ago, I tattooed a Research & Development Engineer who worked; at different times in his career; for the German Metzeler and Continental tyre companies.
We chin-wagged for ages about motorcycle tyre tech etc. and I clearly remember us talking about this particular subject, he said that this is indeed the reason for the opposite facing tread patterns.

Cheers!
mike
 
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