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Discussion Starter #1
I went to Antique Motorcycles/ The Naked Racer Cafe in Melbourne this morning. They have an antique triumph bobber that grabbed my attention (photos below). I figure this is the sort of bike that has inspired our current rides. If anyone is in the Melbourne area it is well worth a visit.
 

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Thanks for sharing. The image is correct in proving inspiration for the Bobber, no doubt. I think the image invokes freedom by its lack of frivolous extras. Less-is-more theme.

Rode with others to a rodeo last night in Whitesboro, Texas, (not too far from Melbourne, :) and some cowboys went on & on about the Bobber's looks.

I thought about its appeal on the ride home. I concluded the stuff that's added (bags, fairing, windshield, etc) on most bikes, while justified for (especially long-distant riding) comfort and convenience, there yet remains a yearning for just plain raw basics riding seen in motorcycles themselves, but more especially bobbers. It sort of takes one back to days of old, when things were less complicated (albeit, Triumph has hidden all the complicated gadgets well). Plus, simplicity is pleasing to the eye.
 

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I’m bummed that I spent all January in Melbourne and somehow didn’t run across this cafe or bike. What was I thinking? What neighborhood is it in?
 

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I think the image invokes freedom by its lack of frivolous extras. Less-is-more theme.
I agree. The Bobber evokes the 'iron horse' response in me and I suspect in others too. My first ever bike was an MZ TS125, which really was totally basic. Although I was happy to upgrade as quick as I could, there is a vibe from something that is really dependable, and if it ever breaks you can fix it yourself.

Of course the Bobber just looks like that. It's not at all basic, it has computer-mapped fuel injection, engine modes, ride-by-wire and goodness knows what else. But to me it is really the best of both worlds: the look and feel of a basic, simple bike with the performance and comfort of a modern bike. Great job, Triumph!

- Pasta
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The cafe/ museum is in the Moorabbin airport precinct, a small airport south east of the city, not the main airport. It’s a quirky place, loaded with interesting historical bikes. They also have one of the Triumph Bonnevilles specially made for Queen Elizabeth’s 2nd Jubilee.

I think the thing that drew me to the bobber originally was the combination of classic styling like the Speed Twin, less is more appearance like the antique bobber and modern technology for every day riding. There aren’t many bikes out there that tick all those boxes.
 

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Not surprisingly, we never got to that area, although we got to know the city and a lot of its neighborhoods pretty well particularly Fitzroy which kept drawing us back. We were actually staying in a great AirBnB in Port Melbourne but, the tram system is so good, you could get anywhere in about 15-20 minutes. And walking the city is even better. Had some nice talks with the guys at Saint and in another shop, I think on Smith St., but can't remember the shop's name (they had some vintage motorcycles in the shop and sold riding jeans, etc.). All in all, a fabulous city (except for maybe that driving on the other side thing :)
 

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I think the thing that drew me to the bobber originally was the combination of classic styling like the Speed Twin, less is more appearance like the antique bobber and modern technology for every day riding. There aren’t many bikes out there that tick all those boxes.[/QUOTE]

Well said. My sentiments exactly.
It just suits me.
 
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