Shifting RPM - Triumph Bobber Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-06-2018, 06:20 PM Thread Starter
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Shifting RPM

hello everyone,

i am a new triumph bobber owner & rider. i have ridden other motorcycles though, but thought of asking this question here.

considering a sunny day riding conditions, what's the ideal rpm at which you shift to the next gear?

sorry if it's a very dumb question.

cheers,
audi
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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-06-2018, 06:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whiskeytangofoxtrot View Post
hello everyone,

i am a new triumph bobber owner & rider. i have ridden other motorcycles though, but thought of asking this question here.

considering a sunny day riding conditions, what's the ideal rpm at which you shift to the next gear?

sorry if it's a very dumb question.

cheers,
audi
I believe peak torque is around 4000 rpm... Iíve found thereís little point in ringing out to the red line, thereís just not a lot up in the higher rpm. Itís far more fun to keep the bike in the sweet spot so I tend to call it a day around 6-6.5k
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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-06-2018, 07:07 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks Mike.

Cheers,
Audi
2018 Bobber in Black.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-06-2018, 11:25 PM
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Hello and welcome to the forum, WTF. There are many views on this issue. Some follow the factory recommendations to keep rpm's to 4000 rpm during break in. Some (and you can find with a search on google) suggest that wringing it out during break in is the best way to seat rings is what you should do. This is fine for GP Moto bikes, which is what their findings are founded which get their engines new or rebuilt each race or so.


I'm with Mike, keep it around 6000 rpm and no higher IMO and enjoy. Then go wild as you prefer.

2018 Bobber in Morello Red
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-07-2018, 02:38 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for your response.

The guys from the dealership advised me to keep it below 5000 before the bike's break in period. I intend to keep it as light as possible since i love my bike(s) and i push them hard only when absolutely needed.

Cheers,
Audi
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-07-2018, 04:53 AM
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It's a close ratio box, and on the way back from first service yesterday I experimented on the highway... 70 mph =4000 rpm in 4th, 3500 in 5th and 3000 in 6th, and without wringing it's neck, my Speedmaster is also happy accelerating up to 55 in 2nd (one glorious 3 vehicle overtake on a single carriageway road... I also find any right angle turn into a side road is rarely better when NOT in first...

Larry


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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-07-2018, 05:47 AM
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difficult to say... I'd say I go up to 3,000 revs to shift up when riding normal that seems to be most comfortable. On the other hand chasing the 4 wheel metalboxes on country roads sometimes I push up in 3rd or 4th to 5,000 revs just to overtake them as safely as possible.


The amzing thing is that I can go in town with slighly more revs than in idle without the bike complaining, 4th gear, 1,800 revs, 50 km/h dead easy (tell that our Ducati scrambler that italian bitch does not like anything under 3,000 revs)

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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 07-07-2018, 06:36 AM
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Having fun, roughly 5500-6000 since upshifting will make me end up around 4000 where the engine has max torque.
Going through city traffic with light load only, 2500-3000 is enough and I keep her running somewhere between 2000-3000.

The engine has a rather short stroke however and does love higher revs, so I tend to keep her above 3000 when loaded since otherwise it's just too much strain.

Means I upshift to 6th gear on straight and even roads only and I don't even care about 6th (or even 5th) in hilly terrain, it's just too long.

As for break-in or generic "engine treatment", I've had my share of issues with engines that were only run at low rpm and light load because the owner wanted to "conserve them". Soot build up in the engine, gas or diesel blowby in the engine oil, etc.

The most important thing is to keep low revs while the engine is cold, but already give it moderate load so it gets to operating temperature soon.
Once it is thoroughly warm - both water AND oil, which takes its time - fully loading it and reving it from time to time will help keep the engine clean and performing. I've done that with all my engines (both cars and bikes) before and you definitely can tell a difference in engine health, especially if you service it yourself and see the condition it is in.

Tom
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